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Comparison of past and present administrative divisions of Japan

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Title: Comparison of past and present administrative divisions of Japan  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Nankaidō, Gokishichidō, Tōsandō, San'yōdō, San'indō, Hokurikudō, Tōkaidō (region)
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Comparison of past and present administrative divisions of Japan

The geography and administrative subdivisions of Japan have evolved and changed during the course of its history. These were sometimes grouped according to geographic position.[1]

Kinai

Tōkaidō

The Tōkaidō' is a region; and its name literally means 'Eastern Sea Way'.[2] The term also identifies a series of roads connecting the 15 provincial capitals of the region.[3]

Tōsandō

The Tōsandō is a region which straddles the central mountains of northern Honshū.[4] The descriptive name also refers to a series of roads connecting the provincial capitals.[3] Tōsandō included Musashi province after 711.[4]

Hokurikudō

  • Wakasa
  • Echizen (broke off from Koshi during the end of the 7th century)
  • Kaga (created in 823 from Echizen)
  • Noto (created in 718 from Echizen, then occupied in 741 by Etchū, later re-split in 757 from Etchū)
  • Etchū (broke off from Koshi during the end of the 7th century)
  • Echigo (broke off from Koshi during the end of the 7th century)
  • Sado (occupied in 743 by Echigo, later re-split in 752)

San'indō

San'yōdō

Nankaidō

Saikaidō

Hokkaidō

Notes

  1. ^ Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric. (2005). "Provinces and prefectures" in , p. 780Japan Encyclopedia, p. 780, at Google Books; excerpt, "Japan's former provinces were converted into prefectures by the Meiji government ... [and] grouped, according to geographic position, into the 'five provinces of the Kinai' and 'seven circuits'."
  2. ^ Nussbaum, "Tōkaidō" at p. 973, p. 973, at Google Books.
  3. ^ a b Titsingh, Isaac. (1834). p. 57.Annales des empereurs du japon, , p. 57, at Google Books
  4. ^ a b Nussbaum, "Tōsandō" at p. 988, p. 988, at Google Books.

References

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