World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Iceland hotspot

Article Id: WHEBN0001810163
Reproduction Date:

Title: Iceland hotspot  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Geography of Iceland, Geology of Iceland, Hotspot (geology), Ellesmere Island Volcanics, ICEARRAY
Collection: Environment of Iceland, Geography of Iceland, Geology of Iceland, Hotspots of the Atlantic Ocean
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Iceland hotspot

Eruption at Krafla, 1984
Active volcanic areas and systems in Iceland

The Iceland hotspot is a hotspot which is partly responsible for the high volcanic activity which has formed the island of Iceland.

Description

Iceland is one of the most active volcanic regions in the world, with eruptions occurring on average roughly every three years (in the 20th century there were 39 volcanic eruptions on and around Iceland). About a third of the basaltic lavas erupted in recorded history have been produced by Icelandic eruptions. Notable eruptions have included that of Eldgjá, a fissure of Katla, in 934 (the world's largest basaltic eruption ever witnessed), Laki in 1783 (the world's second largest), and several eruptions beneath ice caps, which have generated devastating glacial bursts, most recently in 2010 after the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull.

Iceland's location astride the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, where the Eurasian and North American Plates are moving apart, is partly responsible for this intense volcanic activity, but an additional cause is necessary to explain why Iceland is a substantial island while the rest of the ridge mostly consists of seamounts, with peaks below sea level.

As well as being a region of higher temperature than the surrounding mantle, it is also believed to have a higher concentration of water. The presence of water in magma reduces the melting temperature, and this may also play a role in enhancing Icelandic volcanism.

Theories of causation

There is an ongoing discussion whether the hotspot is caused by a deep mantle plume or originates at a much shallower depth.[1]

Some geologists have questioned whether the Iceland hotspot has the same origin as other hotspots such as the Hawaii hotspot. While the Hawaiian island chain and the Emperor Seamounts show a clear time-progressive volcanic track caused by the movement of the Pacific Plate over the Hawaiian hotspot, no such track can be seen at Iceland.

It is proposed that the line [2]

Mantle plume theory

It is believed that a mantle plume underlies Iceland, of which the hotspot is thought to be the surface expression. This enhances the volcanism already caused by plate separation, both at the centre of the island and at the Reykjanes ridge to the southwest of Iceland's main volcanic zone. The plume is believed to be quite narrow, perhaps 100 km across, and extends down to at least 400–650 km beneath the Earth's surface, and possibly

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.