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Limit or extend limits of debate

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Title: Limit or extend limits of debate  
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Limit or extend limits of debate

The motion to limit or extend limits of debate is used to modify the rules of debate.

Explanation and Use

Limit or extend limits of debate (RONR)
Class Subsidiary motion
In order when another has the floor? No
Requires second? Yes
Debatable? No
May be reconsidered? Yes; but if vote was affirmative, only unexecuted part of order. A negative vote on this motion can be reconsidered only until such time as progress in business or debate has made it essentially a new question
Amendable? Yes
Vote required Two-thirds

Robert's Rules of Order Newly Revised

The default norm is allowing each member of a deliberative assembly to make two ten-minute speeches, with a requirement that a member wait for other members who have not spoken on the question to speak before making his second speech.[1]

The Standard Code of Parliamentary Procedure

Limit or extend debate (TSC)
Class Subsidiary motion
In order when another has the floor? No
Requires second? Yes
Debatable? Yes
May be reconsidered? No
Amendable? Yes
Vote required Two-thirds

TSC (The Standard Code) implements this concept as the motion to extend or limit debate. As with Robert's Rules of Order, a variety of limits may be imposed on the debate, including:

  • Limiting the number of minutes allotted to each member. As TSC normally allows for speeches of unlimited length, this motion can impose time limits.
  • Limiting the number of minutes allotted to the entire debate.
  • The number of speeches each member may make.
  • The number of speeches that may be made both for and against the motion, regardless of who makes them.

Alternatively, the motion can also modify or remove limits already imposed. For example, if each speaker is given three minutes, and a speaker reaches their maximum, they may use this motion to request an additional 30 seconds to finish their remarks.

Because this motion by definition limits or changes the limits of the freedom of the body, it requires a vote of two-thirds to pass.

TSC does not normally limit the length of speeches as Robert's does, noting, "Parliamentary law fixes no limit on the length of speeches during debate...Debate can ordinarily be kept within reasonable time limits by the presiding officer's insistence that all discussion be confined strictly to the subject."[2] Also, TSC allows the motion to limit or extend debate to be debated, but only on the merits of the limitations. As with all subsidiary motions, TSC does not allow this motion to be reconsidered.

References

  1. ^ Robert, Henry M. (2000). Robert's Rules of Order Newly Revised, 10th ed., p. 41
  2. ^ Sturgis, Alice (2001). The Standard Code of Parliamentary Procedure, 4th ed., p. 127
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