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2010 in Iraq

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2010 in Iraq

Years in Iraq: 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
Centuries: 20th century · 21st century · 22nd century
Decades: 1980s 1990s 2000s 2010s 2020s 2030s 2040s
Years: 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

Events in the year 2010 in Iraq.

Incumbents

Events

  • March 7 - A parliamentary election was held in Iraq on 7 March 2010. The secular, non-sectarian Iraqi National Movement received the most votes.
  • March 8 - Oil extraction rights to the Maysan Oilfields were granted to China March 8, 2010.[1]
  • August 2 - The New York Times reported that the United States would "withdraw designated combat forces from Iraq by the end of August."[2]
  • August 3 - At least 5 police officers are shot dead at a checkpoint in Baghdad, Iraq.[3]
  • August 7 - 5 Iraqi policemen are killed in an overnight shootout in western Baghdad, while 1 policeman is killed at a checkpoint outside Fallujah.[4]
  • August 18 - The 4th Stryker Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division is the last U.S combat brigade withdraws from Iraq, ending the U.S combat mission in Iraq. 52,600 U.S military personnel remain in Iraq to take on an advisory role.[5]
  • August 19 - U.S. President Barack Obama announced that all U.S.combat operations will end on August 31. 50,000 troops will stay in an advise and assist role. The full withdrawal is scheduled for December 2011.
  • September 13 - A civilian is killed and six people injured in fighting in Iraq's Diyala Governorate.[6]
  • September 15 - US and Iraqi forces raid a neighbourhood in Fallujah resulting in at least six casualties.[7]
  • September 17 - An Iraqi Army soldier is killed and eleven people are wounded following two bombs going off in Baghdad.[8]
  • September 19 - 2 car bombs explode in Baghdad, Iraq, killing at least 31 people and injuring 111.[9]
  • September 26 - The Army of the Guardians of the Islamic Revolution cross the border into Iraq and kill 30 Kurds.[10]

Notable deaths


See also

Notes

  1. ^ http://www.ameinfo.com/226043.html
  2. ^ Baker, Peter (August 2, 2010). "In Speech on Iraq, Obama Reaffirms Drawdown". The New York Times. Retrieved August 2, 2010. 
  3. ^ http://www.aljazeera.net/news/middleeast/2010/08/20108372145585149.html
  4. ^ "Six Iraqi police killed in night of violence". The Guardian (London). August 7, 2010. 
  5. ^ "Goodbye Iraq: Last US Combat Brigade Heads Home". Yahoo! News. 2010-08-19. Retrieved 2010-08-19. 
  6. ^ [1]
  7. ^ [2]
  8. ^ [3]
  9. ^ [4]
  10. ^ "'"Iran 'kills 30 Kurdish militants across Iraq border. BBC News. September 26, 2010. 
  11. ^ Chemical Ali' executed in Iraq"'". BBC News. January 25, 2010. 
  12. ^ Londoño, Ernesto (April 20, 2010). "Two top leaders of the insurgent group al-Qaeda in Iraq are killed in raid". The Washington Post. 
  13. ^ "Gunmen kill prominent Iraqi TV presenter Riad al-Saray". BBC News. September 7, 2010. 
  14. ^ "Second Iraq TV presenter shot, Baghdad bombs kill four". BBC News. September 8, 2010. 

External links

  • Obama Claims End to Combat Operations in Iraq, But Iraqis See Same War Under a Different Name - video report by Democracy Now!
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