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Francesco Barbaro (patriarch of Aquileia)

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Francesco Barbaro (patriarch of Aquileia)

Francesco Barbaro (March 16, 1546 in Venice – April 27, 1616 in Udine) was a Venetian diplomat and an Italian Catholic bishop

He was the great-grandson of Francesco Barbaro and son of Marcantonio Barbaro. From 1578 to 1581 he was ambassador at the court of Savoy.[1][2] He served as Ambassador to Florence in 1585.[3]

When the Patriarch of Aquileia, Giovanni Grimani, asked Pope Sixtus V for an assistant, the Pope chose Francisco Barbaro for his experience in politics and diplomacy. On October 17, 1585, Barbaro was consecrated as the titular Archbishop of Tyre. On 3 October 1593, Grimani died and Francesco Barbaro was officially named to replace him, as Patriarch of Aquileia.[4][5]

In 1595 Barbaro opened the diocesan synod in the Castello di San Daniele. This synod was marked by conflict between the canons of Udine and Cividale over which of two locations was the most important. Barbaro decided that precedent supported Udine; the clerics of Cividale protested.

In the same year Francesco asked Pope Clement VIII to appoint his younger brother Ermolao Barbaro as his coadjutor. On February 12, 1596 the Pope appointed Ermolao Barbaro as archbishop of Tyre.

Francesco supported the Roman Rite of Pius V over the older Aquileian Rite. He persuaded Udine to adopt the Roman Rite at the provincial synod held on October 19–27, 1596. Barbaro did the same on 11 May 1600 at the provincial synod of Cividale and in 23 June 1602 with that of Gorizia.

Patriarch Francesco had a new Patriarchal Palace built in Udine and a new seminary for clerics.[6] Until that time the residence of the patriarchs had been on top of the hill, but as the Republic of Venice wanted to build a fortress there. Statues of the previous Patriarchs were set up in the new building and Barbaro donated his personal library. He is buried in the church of Sant 'Antonio Abate di Udine, along with his brother who succeeded him to lead the Patriarchate under the name of Ermolao Barbaro II.[7]

Sources

This article incorporates information from the equivalent article on the Italiano WorldHeritage.
  1. ^ “Rivista, Volume 1”, Collegio araldico, 1903, pg. 366
  2. ^ “Una famiglia veneziana nella storia: i Barbaro”, Michela Marangoni, Manlio Pastore Stocchi, Istituto Veneto di Scienze, Lettere ed Arti, 1996, pg. 97 [1], ISBN 88-86166-34-6
  3. ^ “Rivista, Volume 1”, Collegio araldico, 1903, pg. 366
  4. ^ “Rivista, Volume 1”, Collegio araldico, 1903, pg. 366
  5. ^ “Una famiglia veneziana nella storia: i Barbaro”, Michela Marangoni, Manlio Pastore Stocchi, Istituto Veneto di Scienze, Lettere ed Arti, 1996, pg. 97 [2], ISBN 88-86166-34-6
  6. ^ “Una famiglia veneziana nella storia: i Barbaro”, Michela Marangoni, Manlio Pastore Stocchi, Istituto Veneto di Scienze, Lettere ed Arti, 1996, pg. 97 [3], ISBN 88-86166-34-6
  7. ^ “Una famiglia veneziana nella storia: i Barbaro”, Michela Marangoni, Manlio Pastore Stocchi, Istituto Veneto di Scienze, Lettere ed Arti, 1996, pg. 97 [4], ISBN 88-86166-34-6
  • Giuseppe Cappelletti, Le chiese d'Italia della loro origine sino ai nostri giorni, Vol. VIII, Venezia, 1851
  • Peruzzo Armando, L'opera pastorale di Mons. Francesco Barbaro, patriarca d'Aquileia (1585–1616), Pontificia Universitas Gregoriana, Roma, 1949
  • Giuseppe Trebbi, Francesco Barbaro: patrizio Veneto e patriarca di Aquileia, Udine, Casamassima, 1984
  • Giuseppe Trebbi, Il Friuli dal 1420 al 1797: la storia politica e sociale, Udine, Casamassima, 1998
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