World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Food physical chemistry

Article Id: WHEBN0032969820
Reproduction Date:

Title: Food physical chemistry  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Food chemistry, Food science, Food engineering, Physical chemistry
Collection: Food Chemistry, Physical Chemistry
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Food physical chemistry

Food physical chemistry is considered to be a branch of Food chemistry[1][2] concerned with the study of both physical and chemical interactions in foods in terms of physical and chemical principles applied to food systems, as well as the applications of physical/chemical techniques and instrumentation for the study of foods.[3][4][5][6] This field encompasses the "physiochemical principles of the reactions and conversions that occur during the manufacture, handling, and storage of foods"[7]

Food physical chemistry concepts are often drawn from rheology, theories of transport phenomena, physical and chemical thermodynamics, chemical bonds and interaction forces, quantum mechanics and reaction kinetics, biopolymer science, colloidal interactions, nucleation, glass transitions and freezing,[8][9] disordered/noncrystalline solids.

Techniques utilized range widely from dynamic rheometry, optical microscopy, electron microscopy, AFM, light scattering, X-ray diffraction/neutron diffraction,[10] to MRI, spectroscopy (NMR,[11] FT-NIR/IR, NIRS, ESR and EPR,[12][13] CD/VCD,[14] Fluorescence, FCS, [15][16][17][18][19] HPLC, GC-MS,[20][21] and other related analytical techniques.

Understanding food processes and the properties of foods requires a knowledge of physical chemistry and how it applies to specific foods and food processes. Food physical chemistry is essential for improving the quality of foods, their stability and food product development. Because food science is a multi-disciplinary field, food physical chemistry is being developed through interactions with other areas of food chemistry and food science, such as: food analytical chemistry, food process engineering/food processing, food and bioprocess technology, food extrusion, food quality control, food packaging, food biotechnology and food microbiology.

Contents

  • Topics in Food physical chemistry 1
  • Related fields 2
  • Techniques gallery: High-Field NMR, CARS (Raman spectroscopy), Fluorescence confocal microscopy and Hyperspectral imaging 3
  • Notes 4
  • See also 5
  • Journals 6
  • External links 7

Topics in Food physical chemistry

The following are examples of topics in food physical chemistry that are of interest to both food industry and food science:

Ice cream or gelato in Rome, Italy
Alternative names Gelato, sorbet, frozen custard
Course Dessert
Main ingredients Milk/Cream, water ice, sugar
Cookbook: 
Starch, 800x magnified, under polarized light
Macaroni is an extruded hollow pasta.
  • Water in foods
    • Local structure in liquid water
    • Micro-crystallization in icecream emulsions
  • Dispersion and surface-adsorption processes in foods
  • Water and protein activities
  • Food hydration and shelf-life
  • Hydrophobic interactions in foods
  • Hydrogen bonding and ionic interactions in foods
  • Disulfide bond breaking and formation in foods
  • Food dispersions
  • Structure-functionality in foods
  • Food micro- and nano- structure
  • Food gels and gelling mechanisms
  • Cross-linking in foods
  • Starch gelatinization and retrogradation
  • Physico-chemical modification of carbohydrates
  • Physico-chemical interactions in food formulations
  • Freezing effects on foods and freeze concentration of liquids
  • Glass transition in wheat gluten and wheat doughs
  • Drying of foods and crops
  • Rheology of wheat doughs, cheese and meat
  • Rheology of extrusion processes
  • Food enzyme kinetics
  • Immobilized enzymes and cells
  • Microencapsulation
  • Carbohydrates structure and interactions with water and proteins
  • Maillard browning reactions
  • Lipids structures and interactions with water and food proteins
  • Food proteins structure, hydration and functionality in foods
  • Food protein denaturation
  • Food enzymes and reaction mechanisms
  • Vitamin interactions and preservation during food processing
  • Interaction of salts and minerals with food proteins and water
  • Color determinations and food grade coloring
  • Flavors and sensorial perception of foods
  • Properties of food additives

Related fields

Visualisation of the human interactome network topology with the blue lines between proteins (represented as points) showing protein-protein interactions.

Techniques gallery: High-Field NMR, CARS (Raman spectroscopy), Fluorescence confocal microscopy and Hyperspectral imaging

Notes

  1. ^ John M. de Man.1999. Principles of Food Chemistry (Food Science Text Series), Springer Science, Third Edition
  2. ^ John M. de Man. 2009. Food process engineering and technology, Academic Press, Elsevier: London and New York, 1st edn.
  3. ^ Pieter Walstra. 2003. Physical Chemistry Of Foods. Marcel Dekker, Inc.: New York, 873 pages
  4. ^ Physical Chemistry Of Food Processes: Fundamental Aspects.1992.van Nostrand-Reinhold vol.1., 1st Edition,
  5. ^ Henry G. Schwartzberg, Richard W. Hartel. 1992. Physical Chemistry of Foods. IFT Basic Symposium Series, Marcel Dekker, Inc.:New York, 793 pages
  6. ^ Physical Chemistry of Food Processes, Advanced Techniques, Structures and Applications.1994. van Nostrand-Reinhold vols.1-2., 1st Edition, 998 pages; 3rd edn. Minuteman Press, 2010; vols. 2-3, fifth edition (in press)
  7. ^ Pieter Walstra. 2003. Physical Chemistry Of Foods. Marcel Dekker, Inc.: New York, 873 pages
  8. ^ Pieter Walstra. 2003. Physical Chemistry Of Foods. Marcel Dekker, Inc.: New York, 873 pages
  9. ^ Physical Chemistry Of Food Processes: Fundamental Aspects.1992.van Nostrand-Reinhold vol.1., 1st Edition,
  10. ^ Physical Chemistry of Food Processes, Advanced Techniques, Structures and Applications.1994. van Nostrand-Reinhold vols.1-2., 1st Edition, 998 pages; 3rd edn. Minuteman Press, 2010; vols. 2-3, fifth edition (in press)
  11. ^ http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/1952/ First Nobel Prize for NMR in Physics, in 1952
  12. ^ http://www.ismrm.org/12/aboutzavoisky.htm ESR discovery in 1941
  13. ^ Abragam, A.; Bleaney, B. Electron paramagnetic resonance of transition ions. Clarendon Press:Oxford, 1970, 1,116 pages.
  14. ^ Physical Chemistry of Food Processes, Advanced Techniques, Structures and Applications.1994. van Nostrand-Reinhold vols.1-2., 1st Edition, 998 pages; 3rd edn. Minuteman Press, 2010; vols. 2-3, fifth edition (in press)
  15. ^ Magde, D., Elson, E. L., Webb, W. W. Thermodynamic fluctuations in a reacting system: Measurement by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy,(1972) Phys Rev Lett, 29, 705–708.
  16. ^ Ehrenberg, M., Rigler, R. Rotational brownian motion and fluorescence intensity fluctuations,(1974) Chem Phys, 4, 390–401.
  17. ^ Elson, E. L., Magde, D. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy I. Conceptual basis and theory,(1974) Biopolymers, 13, 1–27.
  18. ^ Magde, D., Elson, E. L., Webb, W. W. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy II. An experimental realization,(1974) Biopolymers, 13, 29–61.
  19. ^ Thompson N L 1991 Topics in Fluorescence Spectroscopy Techniques vol 1, ed J R Lakowicz (New York: Plenum) pp 337–78
  20. ^ Gohlke, R. S. (1959). "Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry and Gas-Liquid Partition Chromatography". Analytical Chemistry 31 (4): 535.  
  21. ^ Gohlke, R; McLafferty, Fred W. (1993). "Early gas chromatography/mass spectrometry". Journal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry 4 (5): 367.  

See also

Example of a GC-MS instrument
An FTIR interferogram. The central peak is at zero retardation, ZPD) where the maximum amount of light passes through the interferometer to the detector.

Journals

External links

  • ACS Division of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (AGFD)
  • American Chemical Society (ACS)
  • Institute of Food Science and Technology (IFST), (formerly IFT)
  • Dairy Science and Food Technology
  • . (Keith J. Laidler, John H. Meiser and Bryan C. SanctuaryPhysical Chemistry
  • The World of Physical Chemistry (Keith J. Laidler, 1993)
  • Physical Chemistry from Ostwald to Pauling (John W. Servos, 1996)
  • 100 Years of Physical Chemistry (Royal Society of Chemistry, 2004)
  • The Cambridge History of Science: The modern physical and mathematical sciences (Mary Jo Nye, 2003)
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.