World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Brian Taniguchi

Article Id: WHEBN0041282557
Reproduction Date:

Title: Brian Taniguchi  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Hawaii Senate, Jill N. Tokuda, Maile Shimabukuro, Russell Ruderman, Hawaii House Bill 444
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Brian Taniguchi

Brian Taniguchi[1]
Member of the Hawaii Senate
from the 11th district
Assumed office
January 16, 2013
Preceded by Carol Fukunaga
Member of the Hawaii Senate
from the 10th district
In office
January 2003 – January 16, 2013
Preceded by Les Ihara, Jr.
Succeeded by Les Ihara Jr.
Member of the Hawaii Senate
from the 11th district
In office
January 1995 – January 2003
Preceded by Ann Kobayashi
Succeeded by Carol Fukunaga
Member of the Hawaii House of Representatives
from the 23rd district
In office
January 1981 – January 1995
Succeeded by Ed Case
Personal details
Born (1951-11-07) November 7, 1951
Honolulu, Hawaii
Nationality American
Political party Democratic
Residence Honolulu, Hawaii
Alma mater University of Hawaii at Manoa
William S. Richardson School of Law
Profession Lawyer

Brian T. Taniguchi[2] (born November 7, 1951 in Honolulu, Hawaii) is an American politician and a Democratic member of the Hawaii Senate since January 16, 2013 representing District 10. Taniguchi served consecutively from 1995 until 2013 in the District 10 and District 11 seats, having served consecutively in the Hawaii State Legislature from 1981 until 1995 in the Hawaii House of Representatives.

Education

Taniguchi attended University of Hawaii at Manoa and earned his JD from its William S. Richardson School of Law.

Elections

  • 2012 Redistricted back to District 11, Taniguchi directly faced fellow Democratic Senator Carol Fukunaga; Taniguchi won the August 11, 2012 Democratic Primary with 6,527 votes (52.0%),[3] and won the November 6, 2012 General election with 15,639 votes (73.5%) against Republican nominee Larry Fenton.[4]
  • 1980 Taniguchi was initially elected the Hawaii House of Representatives in the November 4, 1980 General election.
  • 1982 Taniguchi was re-elected in the November 2, 1982 General election.
  • 1984 Taniguchi was re-elected in the November 6, 1984 General election
  • 1986 Taniguchi was re-elected in the November 4, 1986 General election.
  • 1988 Taniguchi was re-elected in the November 8, 1988 General election.
  • 1990 Taniguchi was re-elected in the November 6, 1990 General election.
  • 1992 Taniguchi was unopposed for the House District 23 September 19, 1992 Democratic Primary, winning with 3,955 votes,[5] and won the November 3, 1992 General election with 7,368 votes (77.4%) against Libertarian candidate Roger Taylor.[6]
  • 1994 Taniguchi was unopposed for the Senate District 11 September 17, 1994 Democratic Primary, winning with 7,079 votes,[7] and won the November 8, 1994 General election with 10,357 votes (68.6%) against Republican nominee Jeff Tom.[8]
  • 1996 Taniguchi won the September 21, 1996 Democratic Primary with 6,369 votes (71.7%),[9] and won the November 5, 1996 General election with 10,309 votes (69.7%) against Republican nominee John James.[10]
  • 2000 Taniguchi won the September 23, 2000 Democratic Primary with 6,008 votes (71.8%),[11] and won the November 5, 2002 General election with 9,217 votes (68.8%) against Republican nominee Billy Fulton.[12]
  • 2002 Redistricted to District 10, and with Democratic Senator Les Ihara, Jr. redistricted to District 9, Taniguchi was unopposed for the September 21, 2002 Democratic Primary, winning with 6,338 votes,[13] and won the November 5, 2002 General election with 11,328 votes (61.1%) against Republican nominee Gladys Hayes.[14]
  • 2006 Taniguchi was unopposed for both the September 26, 2006 Democratic Primary, winning with 8,233 votes,[15] and the November 7, 2006 General election.[16]
  • 2010 Taniguchi was unopposed for the September 18, 2010 Democratic Primary, winning with 7,778 votes,[17] and won the November 2, 2010 General election with 10,398 votes (69.0%) against Republican nominee Eric Marshall.[18]

References

  1. ^
  2. ^
  3. ^
  4. ^
  5. ^
  6. ^
  7. ^
  8. ^
  9. ^
  10. ^
  11. ^
  12. ^
  13. ^
  14. ^
  15. ^
  16. ^
  17. ^
  18. ^

External links


This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.