Deer Valley Rock Art Center

Deer Valley Rock Art Center
Hedgpeth Hills Petroglyph Site
The entrance in 2013
Location 3711 West Deer Valley Road
Phoenix, Arizona
Coordinates
Area 47 acres
Governing body Arizona State University School of Human Evolution and Social Change
NRHP Reference # 84000718
Added to NRHP February 16, 1984

The Deer Valley Rock Art Center, also known as the Hedgpeth Hills Petroglyph Site and the Sonoran Desert preserve, is a 47-acre archaeological site containing over 1500 Hohokam, Patayan, and Archaic petroglyphs visible on 500 basalt boulders in the Phoenix, Arizona, metro area.[1] The petroglyphs are between 500 and 7,000 years old,[2] and at least one source dates the petroglyphs to 10,000 years ago.[3] The site was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984, and it was also listed with the Phoenix Points of Pride.

A museum designed by Will Bruder was constructed on the site in 1994.[4]


Gallery

The following pictures are of some of the Hohokan Petroglyphs and other items at the Deer Valley Rock Art Center.

Hohokam petroglyphs and other items at the Deer Valley Rock Art Center.
Entrance of the Deer Valley Rock Art Center Museum. Deer Valley Rock Art Center is located in North Phoenix at 3711 W.Deer Valley Road. The site was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on February 16, 1984 and on the Phoenix Points of Pride. National Register of Historic Places ref: 84000718 
National Register of Historic Places Marker of the Deer Valley Rock Art Center. National Register of Historic Places ref: 84000718 
This is a prehistoric Hohokam cooking pit. The pit is located in the Deer Valley Rock Art Center. 
A Petroglyph is a marking carved into a rock usually using a stone tool. 
This Petroglyph with a spiral carved into it was made by the Hohokams over a 1000 years ago. 
This Hohokam Petroglyph is that of a "scene". In the far right hand corner of the Petroglyph the Hohokams sketched two deers bumping heads. 
Hiker posing in front of a Hohokam Petroglyph. Notice, in this Petroglyph the Hohokams sketched two deers bumping heads in the far lower right hand corner. The two deers bumping heads is the symbol of the Deer Valley Rock Art Center. 
View of the Hedgepath Hills and Sonoran Desert from the Deer Valley Rock Art Center. The rocks in the Hedge Hills were formed in the Pliocene era when lava squeezed up through fissures in the earth. This type of volcanic rock is called basalt
Another Hohokam Petroglyph scene. The Petroglyph's in this site are dated from 700 to 1050 AD. 
Another Hohokam Petroglyph. 
Another Hohokam Petroglyph. 
Another Hohokam Petroglyph. 

References

  1. ^ Welsh, Liz; Welsh, Peter (2000). Rock-Art of the Southwest: A Visitor's Companion (Second (2004) ed.). Berkeley, California: Wilderness Press. p. 114. ISBN . 
  2. ^ "Deer Valley Rock Art Center". Smithsonian Magazine. Retrieved December 12, 2013. 
  3. ^ "Deer Valley Rock Art Center". About.Com. Retrieved December 12, 2013. 
  4. ^ "Best Will Bruder Building No One Knows About Phoenix". Phoenix New Times. Retrieved December 12, 2013. 

External links

  • ASU Deer Valley Rock Art Center
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