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Direct vote

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Direct vote

Direct election is a term describing a system of choosing political officeholders in which the voters directly cast ballots for the person, persons or political party that they desire to see elected. The method by which the winner or winners of a direct election are chosen depends upon the electoral system used. The most commonly used systems are the plurality system and the two round system for single winner elections, such as a presidential election, and party-list proportional representation for the election of a legislature.

Examples of directly elected bodies are the European Parliament (since 1979) and the United States Senate (since 1917).

By contrast, in an indirect election, the voters elect a body which in turn elects the officeholder in question. An example is the US Electoral College, whose delegates are elected by voters and in turn elect the next President.


Direct election is a system of elections under which the voters directly elect deputies to representative bodies. Unlike indirect elections, direct elections are the most democratic way of organizing representative institutions, since they effectively express the will of the voters. They also provide an opportunity for exercising the right of recall, whereby deputies who have not justified the trust of the voters are removed.

In the USSR, there are direct elections for positions on the people’s courts and all soviets of people’s deputies



Direct election is a term describing a system of choosing political officeholders in which the voters directly cast ballots for the person, persons or political party that they desire to see elected. The method by which the winner or winners of a direct election are chosen depends upon the electoral system used. The most commonly used systems are the plurality system and the two round system for single winner elections, such as a presidential election, and party-list proportional representation for the election of a legislature.



What Is a Direct Primary Election?


Until the early 20th century, candidates for most elections were chosen by the power brokers of each political party. The catchphrase for this secretive nomination process was "the smoke-filled room," which conjures up images of cigar-chomping party elders haggling over who was to be offered as the party's choice for voters. The rank-and-file party members had no say in the process, and in the general election, the voting public was reduced to an often unsatisfactory choice between handpicked candidates. The lack of transparency in the candidate selection process perpetuated the nomination of privileged or well-connected politicians, denied entry to newcomers and opened the door to all varieties of graft, corruption and cronyism. Direct primary elections, in which voters in each party choose their candidates at the ballot box, were established as part of a strategy to reform society and make government more accountable to citizens


See also

  • Direct election republican model (Australia)
  • International IDEA
  • ACE Project
  • ACE Electoral Knowledge Network Expert site providing encyclopedia on Electoral Systems and Management, country by country data, a library of electoral materials, latest election news, the opportunity to submit questions to a network of electoral experts, and a forum to discuss all of the abovear:انتخاب مباشر
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