Fajr-3 (MIRV)

Template:Dablink

Fajr-3
Type Strategic MRBM
Service history
In service 2006–present
Used by  Iran
Production history
Manufacturer  Iran
Specifications
Warhead Three

Engine Liquid
Operational
range
Unknown (estimated 2,500 km)
Guidance
system
inertial

The Iranian-made Fajr-3 (meaning "dawn" in Persian and Arabic) is believed to be a medium-range ballistic missile with an unknown range (estimated 2,000 km, 1,250 miles). Iranian officials have said that the missile can avoid radar detection and has multiple independently targeted reentry vehicles (MIRV).

The Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps unveiled the missile during the Holy Prophet wargames on March 31, 2006. Islamic Republic of Iran Air Force commander Gen. Hossein Salami announced on television "the successful test-firing of a new missile with greater technical and tactical capabilities than those previously produced". He also said that the missile would carry three warheads, and that each warhead would be capable of hitting its target precisely. He did not specify the missile's range, which can vary with the payload.

References

Operators

See also

External links

  • Iran testfires missile
  • Iran Test-Fires Another 'Top Secret' Missile
  • Iran Says New Missile Test Successful
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.