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List of Russian military bases abroad

Russia has military bases and military objects in foreign countries, especially on the territory of the former Abkhazia and South Ossetia, Ukrainian disputed region of Crimea, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Moldovan disputed region of Transnistria).

Country Type Number
Georgia Base in Abkhazia, on the site of the former Bombora airfield, near Gudauta (7th Military Base).[1] Up to 3,500 personnel.
Armenia Air base in Yerevan, military base in Gyumri (102nd Military Base) 3,214[2] or 5,000 personnel according to another source.[3]
Belarus Volga-type radar station near Hantsavichy and Baranovichi (operational since 2002).[4][5]Naval communication center near Vileyka.[2] Jets deployment at the 61st air base in Baranovichi.[6] 1500 personnel.
Kazakhstan Dnepr radar station in at Balkhash-9 near Lake Balkhash.[2] Sary Shagan testing grounds.[7] Baikonur Cosmodrome,[8][9] the regiment of the transport aviation (Kostanay)
Kyrgyzstan Air base in Kant, the 338th Russian Navy's long-haul communications center, anti-submarine torpedo weapons testing grounds (Karakol, Issyk Kul)
Georgia The Russian 4th Military Base has 2 main compounds in South Ossetia: one on the northwestern outskirts of Tskhinvali and another in Java. There is also a large number of troops stationed in the Leningor District.[1] Up to 4,000 personnel.
Syria Naval facility in Tartus
Tajikistan 4th base of the Ministry of Defense. 7,500 personnel.
Moldova Operational group in Transnistria, consisting of staff, separate maneuver brigades, anti-aircraft missile regiment, independent regiment and air group. Up to 1,500 personnel.
Ukraine Base of the Russian Black Sea Fleet in Sevastopol,[2] Crimea (now under Russian control as a result of the 2014 Crimean crisis) 26,000[2]
Vietnam Logistics base in the port of Cam Ranh Bay.[10] Although military presence had been diminishing for several years, in 2013 Russia and Vietnam signed a new military cooperation agreement.[11]

References

  1. ^ a b Lavrov, Anton (2010). "Post-war Deployment of Russian Forces in Abkhazia and South Ossetia". In Ruslan Pukhov. The Tanks of August. Centre for Analysis of Strategies and Technologies.  
  2. ^ a b c d e Klein, Margarete (2009-10-12). .. "Russia's military capabilities". Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik. 
  3. ^ . "Medvedev Secures Long-Term Foothold in Armenia". The Moscow Times. 2010-08-23. Retrieved 2010-08-23. 
  4. ^ .. "Днепр" на Балхаше ["Dnepr" in Balkhash] (in Russian). Novosti Kosmonavtiki. July 2009. Archived from . the original on 2010-11-09. Retrieved 2012-01-27. 
  5. ^ Heurlin, Beurtel (2005-08-24). Missile Defence: International, Regional and National Implications. Routledge. pp. 84–111.  
  6. ^ http://www.defensenews.com/article/20131209/DEFREG01/..
  7. ^ O'Connor, Sean (2009). . "Russian/Soviet Anti-Ballistic Missile Systems". Air Power Australia. Retrieved 2012-01-07. 
  8. ^ . "Kazcosmos chief Talgat MUSABAEV: BAIKONUR IS STILL THE CORE OF KAZAKH-RUSSIAN COOPERATION IN SPACE". interfax.kz. February 2008. 
  9. ^ . "Kazakhstan Finally Ratifies Baikonur Rental Deal With Russia". spacedaily.com. April 12, 2010. 
  10. ^ . "Mis-typed address or a page does not exist.". 
  11. ^ https://articles/Russia–Vietnam_relations

See also

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