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The rainbow fish

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The rainbow fish

In Hinduism, The Rainbow Fish was a fish that was as large as a whale. It ate Buddha, an incarnation of the deity Vishnu. The Rainbow Fish was caught and killed by some fishermen who freed Buddha from its stomach. After The Rainbow Fish was caught, it provided an entire nation with food for a year.

The scales of the rainbow fish were red, blue, green, and yellow. The green scales were made of grass, representing the element Earth. The blue scales were ice, which represented water: the second element. The yellow scales were lightning, representing air. The red scales were made of fire, representing the fourth element.[1] The four elements that made up The Rainbow Fish's scales are also known as Prithvi, Jal, Vayu, and Agni.[2]

Contents

  • Vishnu 1
  • Avatars 2
  • Buddha in Hinduism 3
  • Panchbhuta 4
  • Earth 5
  • Water 6
  • Air 7
  • Fire 8
  • Sound 9
  • References 10

Vishnu

Vishnu, or Visnu, is a principal deity in Hinduism. His name is Sanskrit for "The Pervader." He was not a major deity in the Vedic period of Hinduism, however he becomes one during the Puranic period. He is associated with the ideal of the divine king. In the Rg Veda he is a benevolent, solar deity.[3] Vishnu is said to manifest a portion of himself anytime he is needed to fight evil and to protect dharma.[4] Vishnu is worshiped as the perserver of the created world. He is also said to be the primal person and the first-born of creation. Some consider him to be the sole source of the universe. He is active in all three parts of its phases: creation, preservation, and dissolution.[5]

Avatars

Vishnu has had at least nine avatars, or incarnations: Matsyathe Fish,[6] Kurmathe Tortoise,[7] Varahathe Boar,[8] Vamanathe Dwarf,[9] Rama Chandra[10] Narashimathe Man-Lion,[11] Parasurama[12] ,[13] Buddha,[14] and Kalkin[15]

Buddha in Hinduism

In Hinduism, Buddha was an avatar of the deity Vishnu. He leads mankind astray with false teaching during the Kali Age, however he is sometimes depicted more positively as a person of compassion.[16] Buddha taught that the universe had no creator and it was wrong to assume there was a Supreme Spirit.[17] Some stories, such as The Buddhist Jataka try to heighten the importance of Buddha in Hinduism.[18] The life history of Buddha in Hinduism is the same as his story in Buddhism, he is just an avatar of Vishnu in Hindu Mythology.[19] Buddha was eventually eaten by The Rainbow Fish before being freed by some fishermen.[20]

Panchbhuta

Panchbhuta, which is also known as the Five Elements, is the start of the universe in Hinduism. It manifests to form the life force and then, later, those five elements disintegrate to ensue a celestial traverse at the Paramanu, or atomic, level. Most elements that make up Pnachbhuta have two forms or characters, the eternal and the perishable.[21]

Earth

Earth, the first element, is also known as Prithvi. Earth has two forms, or characters. The eternal form is called Paramanu, or atom. It also has a perishable form called Karya, or work. This form exists in both animate and inanimate objects. Symbolically speaking, our bodies are also part of earth, but a perishable form. However, elements or atoms are eternal since after death all the atoms get disintegrated to come back to its original eternal form. So our body and its Karya are perishable like mountain or rock forms but the atom remains which are eternal.[22]

Water

The water element is sometimes called Jal in Hindu culture. It is the second element and has two characters. The eternal character is in the shape of atom. Karya, or Work, is perishable and is in the form of sea, river, or pond. Water from the sea or river evaporate to be in the sky and then come down as rain.[23]

Air

Air is also known as Vayu. It is the third element and has two level just like earth and water. Air can be felt as we breathe. We feel storms and strong breezes, which are temporary. However, air at an atomic level is eternal. In the Purana there is a mention of 49 types of Maruts or winds. Seven are important namely 1. Pravaha 2. Avaha; 3. Udvaha 4. Samvaha; 5 Vivaha; 6 Parvaha and 7.Paravaha. The wind which takes the water from the ocean is called Udvaha.[24]

Fire

Fire is also known as Agni and is the fourth element. It is also eternal and perishable. The essential character of fire is to generate heat. According to Hindu Mythology, Agni is one of the Eight guardians who guards our universe and is known as Asta- dik-palakas. In Indian mythology there are mentions of various types of fires. The four important ones are fire of the earth, fire of the sky, fire of the stomach, which can mean hunger or digestive power, and the fire we commonly use.[25]

Sound

Sound is the fifth element and also known as Ether. Unlike the rest of the elements, sound is only ever eternal. Ether is the carrier of sound, even man made. Since it is the only eternal element, it attracted many sages. The concept of Akashvani, or Devine sound, being heard by sages of higher order is related to this Ether or Akasha. The mantras of AUM, Raam, and Shyaam are meant to work as links between Jivatma,life force or soul, to Paramatman, or omnipotent of supreme soul.[26]

References

  1. ^ From: A guide to Hinduism. C.M.Faren
  2. ^ Chatterjee, Gautam. “Panchbhuta,” n.d. http://www.ibiblio.org/gautam/hind0003.htm.
  3. ^ Flood, Gavin D. An Introduction to Hinduism. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press, 1996.
  4. ^ Doniger, Wendy. “Vishnu | Hindu Deity.” Encyclopædia Britannica. Accessed January 24, 2015. http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/630506/Vishnu.
  5. ^ Dimmitt, Cornelia. Classical Hindu Mythology A Reader in the Sanskrit Puranas. Philadelphia PA: Temple University Press, 2012. http://arcadia.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=547390.
  6. ^ Dimmitt, Cornelia. Classical Hindu Mythology A Reader in the Sanskrit Puranas. Philadelphia PA: Temple University Press, 2012. http://arcadia.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=547390.
  7. ^ Dimmitt, Cornelia. Classical Hindu Mythology A Reader in the Sanskrit Puranas. Philadelphia PA: Temple University Press, 2012. http://arcadia.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=547390.
  8. ^ Dimmitt, Cornelia. Classical Hindu Mythology A Reader in the Sanskrit Puranas. Philadelphia PA: Temple University Press, 2012. http://arcadia.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=547390.
  9. ^ Dimmitt, Cornelia. Classical Hindu Mythology A Reader in the Sanskrit Puranas. Philadelphia PA: Temple University Press, 2012. http://arcadia.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=547390.
  10. ^ Wilkins, W. J. Hindu Mythology, Vedic and Purānic. London; Totowa, N.J.: Curzon Press; Rowman & Littlefield, 1973.
  11. ^ Dimmitt, Cornelia. Classical Hindu Mythology A Reader in the Sanskrit Puranas. Philadelphia PA: Temple University Press, 2012. http://arcadia.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=547390.
  12. ^ Dimmitt, Cornelia. Classical Hindu Mythology A Reader in the Sanskrit Puranas. Philadelphia PA: Temple University Press, 2012. http://arcadia.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=547390.
  13. ^ Dimmitt, Cornelia. Classical Hindu Mythology A Reader in the Sanskrit Puranas. Philadelphia PA: Temple University Press, 2012. http://arcadia.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=547390.
  14. ^ Dimmitt, Cornelia. Classical Hindu Mythology A Reader in the Sanskrit Puranas. Philadelphia PA: Temple University Press, 2012. http://arcadia.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=547390.
  15. ^ Dimmitt, Cornelia. Classical Hindu Mythology A Reader in the Sanskrit Puranas. Philadelphia PA: Temple University Press, 2012. http://arcadia.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=547390.
  16. ^ Dimmitt, Cornelia. Classical Hindu Mythology A Reader in the Sanskrit Puranas. Philadelphia PA: Temple University Press, 2012. http://arcadia.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=547390.
  17. ^ Wilkins, W. J. Hindu Mythology, Vedic and Purānic. London; Totowa, N.J.: Curzon Press; Rowman & Littlefield, 1973.
  18. ^ Narayan Aiyangar. Ancient Hindu Mythology. New Delhi: Deep & Deep, 1983.
  19. ^ Wilkins, W. J. Hindu Mythology, Vedic and Purānic. London; Totowa, N.J.: Curzon Press; Rowman & Littlefield, 1973.
  20. ^ From: A guide to Hinduism. C.M.Faren
  21. ^ Chatterjee, Gautam. “Panchbhuta,” n.d. http://www.ibiblio.org/gautam/hind0003.htm.
  22. ^ Chatterjee, Gautam. “Panchbhuta,” n.d. http://www.ibiblio.org/gautam/hind0003.htm.
  23. ^ Chatterjee, Gautam. “Panchbhuta,” n.d. http://www.ibiblio.org/gautam/hind0003.htm.
  24. ^ Chatterjee, Gautam. “Panchbhuta,” n.d. http://www.ibiblio.org/gautam/hind0003.htm.
  25. ^ Chatterjee, Gautam. “Panchbhuta,” n.d. http://www.ibiblio.org/gautam/hind0003.htm.
  26. ^ Chatterjee, Gautam. “Panchbhuta,” n.d. http://www.ibiblio.org/gautam/hind0003.htm.
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