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2002 In Spaceflight

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2002 In Spaceflight

2002in spaceflight
Soyuz TMA-1, the first Soyuz-TMA spacecraft, approaches the International Space Station in November
Orbital launches
First 16 January
Last 29 December
Total 66
Catalogued 63
National firsts
Satellite  Algeria
Space traveller  South Africa
Rockets
Maiden flights Ariane 5ECA
Atlas IIIB
Atlas V 401
Delta IV-M+ (4,2)
H-IIA 2024
Retirements Ariane 4 42L
Ariane 4 42P
Atlas IIA
Manned flights
Orbital 7
Total travellers 40

Contents

  • Launches 1
    • January 1.1
    • February 1.2
    • March 1.3
    • April 1.4
    • May 1.5
    • June 1.6
    • July 1.7
    • August 1.8
    • September 1.9
    • October 1.10
    • November 1.11
    • December 1.12
  • Deep Space Rendezvous 2
  • EVAs 3
  • References 4
    • Footnotes 4.1


Launches

Milstar DFS-5(USA-164), Decay:NA" INSAT-3C, Decay:NA" MDS-1, Decay:NA" DASH, Decay:NA" HESSI, Decay:NA" Iridium 91, Decay:NA" Iridium 90, Decay:NA" Iridium 94, Decay:NA" Iridium 95, Decay:NA" Iridium 96, Decay:NA" Echostar 7, Decay:NA" Intelsat 904, Decay:NA" Kosmos 2387, Decay:27 June" Envisat, Decay:NA" STS-109, Decay:12 March" TDRS-9(TDRS-I), Decay:NA" GRACE 1, Decay:NA" GRACE 2, Decay:NA" Progress M1-8, Decay:25 June" Shenzhou 3, Decay:1 April" Shenzhou spacecraftorbital module, Decay:12 November" Astra 3A, Decay:NA" JCSAT 8, Decay:NA" Intelsat 903, Decay:NA" Kosmos 2388, Decay:14 September 2011" STS-110, Decay:19 April" S0 Truss, Decay:NA" NSS 7, Decay:NA" Soyuz TM-34, Decay:10 November" SPOT-5, Decay:NA" BreizhSat-Oscar 47(Indefix), Decay:NA" BreizhSat-Oscar 48(Indefix), Decay:NA" Aqua, Decay:NA" DirecTV-5, Decay:NA" Hai Yang 1, Decay:NA" Feng Yun 1D, Decay:NA" Ofeq-5, Decay:NA" Kosmos 2389, Decay:NA" Intelsat 905, Decay:NA" STS-111, Decay:19 June" Leonardo MPLM, Decay:NA" Canadarm2 Mobile Base Structure, Decay:NA" Ekspress A1R, Decay:NA" Galaxy 3C, Decay:NA" Iridium 97, Decay:NA" Iridium 98, Decay:NA" NOAA-17(NOAA-M), Decay:NA" Progress M-46, Decay:14 October" CONTOUR, Decay:NA" Stellat 5, Decay:NA" NStar C, Decay:NA" Kosmos 2390, Decay:NA" Kosmos 2391, Decay:NA" Kosmos 2392, Decay:NA" Hot Bird 6, Decay:NA" Echostar 8, Decay:NA" Atlantic Bird 1, Decay:NA" Meteosat 8, Decay:NA" Intelsat 906, Decay:NA" USERS, Decay:15 June 2007" DRTS, Decay:NA" Kalpana-1(METSAT 1), Decay:NA" HTSTL-1, Decay:15 September" Hispasat 1D, Decay:NA" Progress M1-9, Decay:1 February 2003" Nadezhda-M, Decay:NA" STS-112, Decay:18 October" S1 Truss, Decay:NA" CETA, Decay:NA" Foton-M1, Decay:NA" INTEGRAL, Decay:NA" Zi Yau 2, Decay:NA" Soyuz TMA-1, Decay:4 May 2003" Eutelsat W5, Decay:NA" STS-113, Decay:7 December" P1 Truss, Decay:NA" MEPSI, Decay:31 January 2003" Astra 1K, Decay:10 December" AlSat-1, Decay:NA" Mozhayets-3, Decay:NA" Rubin-3-DSI, Decay:NA" TDRS-10(TDRS-J), Decay:NA" Hot Bird 7, Decay:NA" Stentor, Decay:NA" Adeos 2, Decay:NA" Mu-Labsat, Decay:NA" RITE, Decay:NA" RITE, Decay:NA" FedSat, Decay:NA" WEOS(Kanta-Kun), Decay:NA" NSS-6, Decay:NA" LatinSat 1, Decay:NA" LatinSat 2, Decay:NA" SaudiSat 1S, Decay:NA" UniSat 2, Decay:NA" Rubin 2, Decay:NA" Kosmos 2393, Decay:22 December 2013" Kosmos 2394(GLONASS), Decay:NA" Kosmos 2395(GLONASS), Decay:NA" Kosmos 2396(GLONASS), Decay:NA" Shenzhou 4, Decay:5 January 2003" Shenzhou spacecraft orbital module, Decay:9 September 2003" Nimiq 2, Decay:NA"
Date and time (UTC) Rocket Launch site LSP
Payload Operator Orbit Function Decay (UTC) Outcome
Remarks

January

16 January
00:30
Titan IVB (401)/Centaur Cape Canaveral SLC-40 Lockheed Martin
Milstar DFS-5 (USA-164) US Air Force Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
23 January
23:46
Ariane 4 42L Kourou ELA-2 Arianespace
INSAT-3C ISRO Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
Final flight of Ariane 4 42L

February

4 February
02:45
H-IIA 2024 Tanegashima LA-Y1
MDS-1 JAXA Geostationary transfer Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
DASH JAXA Geostationary transfer Re-entry demonstration In orbit Failure
DASH failed to separate from payload adapter
Maiden flight of H-IIA 2024
5 February
20:58
Pegasus-XL Stargazer, Cape Canaveral Orbital Sciences
HESSI NASA Low Earth Solar science In orbit Operational
11 February
17:45
Delta II 7920-10C Vandenberg SLC-2W Boeing IDS
Iridium 91 Iridium Low Earth Communications In orbit Operational
Iridium 90 Iridium Low Earth Communications In orbit Operational
Iridium 94 Iridium Low Earth Communications In orbit Operational
Iridium 95 Iridium Low Earth Communications In orbit Operational
Iridium 96 Iridium Low Earth Communications In orbit Operational
21 February
12:43
Atlas IIIB Cape Canaveral SLC-36B International Launch Services
Echostar 7 Echostar Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
Maiden flight of Atlas IIIB
23 February
06:59
Ariane 4 44L Kourou ELA-2 Arianespace
Intelsat 904 Intelsat Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
25 February
17:26
Soyuz-U Plesetsk Site 43/3 VKS
Kosmos 2387 VKS Low Earth Reconnaissance 27 June
02:30
Successful

March

1 March
01:07
Ariane 5G Kourou ELA-3 Arianespace
Envisat ESA Sun-synchronous Environmental research In orbit Operational
1 March
11:22
Space Shuttle Columbia Kennedy LC-39A United Space Alliance
STS-109 NASA Low Earth (HST) HST servicing 12 March Operational
Manned orbital flight with 7 astronauts
Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission 3B
8 March
22:59
Atlas IIA Cape Canaveral SLC-36A International Launch Services
TDRS-9 (TDRS-I) NASA Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Partial spacecraft failure
Operational
Propellant issues shortly after launch halved spacecraft fuel supply
17 March
09:21
Rockot/Briz-KM Plesetsk Site 133/3 Eurockot
GRACE 1 NASA Sun-synchronous In orbit Operational
GRACE 2 NASA Sun-synchronous In orbit Operational
21 March
20:13
Soyuz-U Baikonur Site 1/5 Roskosmos
Progress M1-8 Roskosmos Low Earth (ISS) Logistics 25 June
12:13
Successful
ISS flight 7P
25 March
14:15
Long March 2F Jiuquan CAAC
Shenzhou 3 CAAC Low Earth Test spacecraft 1 April
08:51
Successful
Shenzhou spacecraft orbital module CAAC Low Earth Scientific research 12 November Successful
29 March
01:29
Ariane 4 44L Kourou ELA-2 Arianespace
Astra 3A SES Astra Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
JCSAT 8 JSAT Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
30 March
17:25
Proton-K/DM-2M Baikonur Site 81/23 International Launch Services
Intelsat 903 Intelsat Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational

April

1 April
22:06
Molniya-M Plesetsk Site 16/2 VKS
Kosmos 2388 VKS Molniya Missile early warning 14 September 2011 Operational
8 April
20:44
Space Shuttle Atlantis Kennedy LC-39B United Space Alliance
STS-110 NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS assembly 19 April Successful
S0 Truss NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS component In orbit Operational
Manned orbital flight with 7 astronauts
16 April
23:02
Ariane 4 44L Kourou ELA-2 Arianespace
NSS 7 SES New Skies Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
25 April
06:26
Soyuz-U Baikonur Site 1/5 Roskosmos
Soyuz TM-34 Roskosmos Low Earth (ISS) ISS escape craft 10 November Successful
Manned orbital flight with 3 cosmonauts including one space tourist and the first South African space traveller
Final flight of Soyuz-TM spacecraft

May

4 May
01:31
Ariane 4 42P Kourou ELA-2 Arianespace
SPOT-5 CNES Low Earth Earth imaging In orbit Operational
BreizhSat-Oscar 47 (Indefix) AMSAT Low Earth Communications In orbit Operational
BreizhSat-Oscar 48 (Indefix) AMSAT Low Earth Communications In orbit Operational
Final flight of Ariane 4 42P
4 May
09:54
Delta II 7920-10L Vandenberg SLC-2W Boeing IDS
Aqua NASA Sun-synchronous (A-train) Environmental research In orbit Operational
7 May
17:00
Proton-K/DM-2M Baikonur Site 81/23 International Launch Services
DirecTV-5 DirecTV Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
15 May
01:50
Long March 4B Taiyuan
Hai Yang 1 CASC Low Earth Earth observation In orbit Operational
Feng Yun 1D CASC Low Earth Weather satellite In orbit Operational
28 May
15:25
Shavit-1 Palmachim IAI
Ofeq-5 Low Earth (retrograde) Reconnaissance In orbit Operational
28 May
18:14
Kosmos-3M Plesetsk Site 132/1 VKS
Kosmos 2389 Low Earth In orbit Operational

June

5 June
06:44
Ariane 4 44L Kourou ELA-2 Arianespace
Intelsat 905 Intelsat Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
5 June
21:22
Space Shuttle Endeavour Kennedy LC-39A United Space Alliance
STS-111 NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS assembly 19 June Successful
Leonardo MPLM ASI/NASA Low Earth (ISS) Logistics Successful
Canadarm2 Mobile Base Structure NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS component In orbit Operational
Manned orbital flight with 7 astronauts
ISS crew exchange (launched Expedition 5)
10 June
01:14
Proton-K/DM-2M Baikonur Site 200/39
Ekspress A1R Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
Guidance error during ascent, recovered and placed in correct orbit using upper stage
15 June
22:39
Zenit-3SL Ocean Odyssey Sea Launch
Galaxy 3C PanAmSat Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
20 June
09:33
Rockot/Briz-KM Plesetsk Site 133/3 Eurockot
Iridium 97 Iridium Low Earth Communications In orbit Operational
Iridium 98 Iridium Low Earth Communications In orbit Operational
24 June
18:23
Titan 23G Vandenberg SLC-4W Lockheed Martin
NOAA-17 (NOAA-M) NOAA Sun-synchronous Weather satellite In orbit Operational
26 June
05:36
Soyuz-U Baikonur Site 1/5 Roskosmos
Progress M-46 Roskosmos Low Earth (ISS) Logistics 14 October Successful
ISS flight 8P

July

3 July
06:47
Delta II 7425-9.5 Cape Canaveral SLC-17A Boeing IDS
CONTOUR NASA Intended: Heliocentric Comet probe In orbit Failure
Exploded during injection into Heliocentric orbit
Intended to visit comet 2P/Encke
5 July
23:22
Ariane 5G Kourou ELA-3 Arianespace
Stellat 5 Stellat Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
NStar C Stellat Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
8 July
06:35
Kosmos-3M Plesetsk Site 132/1 VKS
Kosmos 2390 Low Earth Communications In orbit Operational
Kosmos 2391 Low Earth Communications In orbit Operational
25 July
15:13
Proton-K/17S40 Baikonur Site 81/24 VKS
Kosmos 2392 Low Earth Reconnaissance In orbit Operational

August

21 August
22:05
Atlas V 401 Cape Canaveral SLC-41 International Launch Services
Hot Bird 6 Eutelsat Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
Maiden flight of Atlas V and the first launch of an EELV class rocket
22 August
05:15
Proton-K/DM-2M Baikonur Site 81/23 International Launch Services
Echostar 8 Echostar Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
28 August
22:45
Ariane 5G Kourou ELA-3 Arianespace
Atlantic Bird 1 Eutelsat Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
Meteosat 8 Eumetsat Geosynchronous Weather satellite In orbit Operational

September

6 September
06:44
Ariane 4 44L Kourou ELA-2 Arianespace
Intelsat 906 Intelsat Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
10 September
08:20
H-IIA 2024 Tanegashima LA-Y1
USERS JAXA Low Earth Microgravity experiments 15 June 2007
19:56
Successful
DRTS NASDA Geostationary Communications In orbit Operational
12 September
10:23
PSLV-C Satish Dhawan ISRO
Kalpana-1 (METSAT 1) ISRO Geostationary Weather satellite In orbit Operational
15 September
10:30
Kaituozhe-1 Taiyuan
HTSTL-1 Tsinghua University Intended: Low Earth Experimental 15 September Launch failure
Second stage malfunction
18 September
22:04
Atlas IIAS Cape Canaveral SLC-36A International Launch Services
Hispasat 1D Hispasat Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
25 September
16:58
Soyuz-FG Baikonur Site 1/5 Roskosmsos
Progress M1-9 Roskosmos Low Earth (ISS) Logistics 1 February 2003 Successful
ISS flight 9P
26 September
14:27
Kosmos-3M Plesetsk Site 132/1 VKS
Nadezhda-M VKS Low Earth Navigation In orbit Operational

October

7 October
10:46
Space Shuttle Atlantis Kennedy LC-39B United Space Alliance
STS-112 NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS assembly 18 October Successful
S1 Truss NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS component In orbit Operational
CETA NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS component In orbit Operational
Manned orbital flight with 6 astronauts
15 October
18:20
Soyuz-U Plesetsk Site 43/3
Foton-M1 ESA Intended: Low Earth Microgravity experiments T+29 seconds Launch failure
LRB exploded
17 October
04:41
Proton-K/17S40 Baikonur Site 81/23
INTEGRAL ESA High Earth (High eccentricity) Astrophysics In orbit Operational
Final flight of 17S40 upper stage
27 October
03:17
Long March 4B Taiyuan
Zi Yau 2 CAST Low Earth Reconnaissance In orbit Operational
30 October
03:11
Soyuz-FG Baikonur Site 1/5 Roskosmos
Soyuz TMA-1 Roskosmos Low Earth (ISS) ISS escape craft 4 May 2003 Successful
Manned orbital flight with 3 cosmonauts
Maiden flight of Soyuz-TMA spacecraft

November

20 November
22:39
Delta IV-M+ (4,2) (9240) Cape Canaveral SLC-37B Boeing IDS
Eutelsat W5 Eutelsat Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
Maiden flight of Delta IV
24 November
00:49
Space Shuttle Endeavour Kennedy LC-39A United Space Alliance
STS-113 NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS assembly 7 December Successful
P1 Truss NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS component In orbit Operational
MEPSI NASA Low Earth Technology demonstration 31 January 2003 Successful
Manned orbital flight with 7 astronauts
ISS crew exchange (launched Expedition 6)
MEPSI is 2 picosatellites connected by a 15 meter tether
25 November
23:04
Proton-K/DM-2M Baikonur Site 81/23 International Launch Services
Astra 1K SES Astra Intended: Geosynchronous
Attained: Low Earth
Communications 10 December Launch failure
Upper stage malfunction resulted in satellite being placed into an unusable parking orbit. Intentionally de-orbited.
28 November
06:07
Kosmos-3M Plesetsk Site 132/1 VKS
AlSat-1 CNTS Low Earth Disaster monitoring In orbit Operational
Mozhayets-3 Mozhaisky Low Earth Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
Rubin-3-DSI OHB System Low Earth Measure carrier rocket performance In orbit Successful
AlSat was first Algerian satellite, Rubin intentionally remained attached to upper stage

December

5 December
02:42
Atlas IIA Cape Canaveral SLC-36A International Launch Services
TDRS-10 (TDRS-J) NASA Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
Final flight of Atlas IIA
11 December
22:22
Ariane 5ECA Kourou ELA-3 Arianespace
Hot Bird 7 Eutelsat Intended: Geosynchronous Communications T+178 seconds Launch failure
Stentor Eutelsat Intended: Geosynchronous Communications
Engine failure leading to loss of control, self-destruct activated
Maiden flight of Ariane 5ECA
14 December
23:04
H-IIA 202 Tanegashima LA-Y1
Adeos 2 NASDA Low Earth Environmental research In orbit Operational
Mu-Labsat NASDA Low Earth Technology development In orbit Operational
RITE NASDA Low Earth Technology development In orbit Operational
RITE NASDA Low Earth Technology development In orbit Operational
FedSat Centre for Satellite Systems Low Earth Communications In orbit Operational
WEOS (Kanta-Kun) Chiba Institute of Technology Low Earth Landsat In orbit Operational
RITE deployed by Mu-Labsat on 14 March 2003 at 01:40 and 01:50 UTC
17 December
23:04
Ariane 4 44L Kourou ELA-2 Arianespace
NSS-6 SES New Skies Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
20 December
17:00
Dnepr-1 Baikonur Site 109/95 ISC Kosmotras
LatinSat 1 Aprize Low Earth Communications In orbit Operational
LatinSat 2 Aprize Low Earth Communications In orbit Operational
SaudiSat 1S RSRI Low Earth Communications In orbit Operational
UniSat 2 University of Rome La Sapienza Low Earth Technology development In orbit Operational
Rubin 2 OHB System Low Earth Communications In orbit Operational
24 December
12:20
Molniya-M Plesetsk Site 16/2 VKS
Kosmos 2393 VKS Molniya Missile early warning 22 December 2013 Successful
25 December
10:37
Proton-K/DM-2 Baikonur Site 81/23 VKS
Kosmos 2394 (GLONASS) KNITs Medium Earth Navigation In orbit Operational
Kosmos 2395 (GLONASS) KNITs Medium Earth Navigation In orbit Operational
Kosmos 2396 (GLONASS) KNITs Medium Earth Navigation In orbit Operational
29 December
16:40
Long March 2F Jiuquan
Shenzhou 4 CASC Low Earth Test spacecraft 5 January 2003
11:16
Successful
Shenzhou spacecraft orbital module CASC Low Earth Test spacecraft 9 September 2003 Successful
29 December
23:16
Proton-M/Briz-M Baikonur Site 81/24 International Launch Services
Nimiq 2 Telesat Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational

Deep Space Rendezvous

Date (GMT) Spacecraft Event Remarks
17 January Galileo 5th flyby of Io
2 November Stardust Flyby of 5535 Annefrank
5 November Galileo Flyby of Amalthea
20 December Nozomi 2nd flyby of the Earth

EVAs

Start Date/Time Duration End Time Spacecraft Crew Function Remarks
14 January
20:59
6 hours
3 minutes
15 January
03:02
Expedition 4
ISS Pirs
Yuri Onufriyenko
Carl E. Walz
Moved the cargo boom for the Russian Strela crane from PMA-1 to the exterior of Pirs, installed an amateur radio antenna onto the end of Zvezda.[1]
25 January
15:19
5 hours
59 minutes
21:18 Expedition 4
ISS Pirs
Yuri Onufriyenko
Daniel W. Bursch
Installed six deflector shields for Zvezda '​s jet thrusters, installed a second amateur radio antenna, attached four science experiments, and retrieved and replaced a device to measure material from the thrusters.[1]
20 February
11:38
5 hours
47 minutes
17:25 Expedition 4
ISS Quest
Carl E. Walz
Daniel W. Bursch
Tested the Quest airlock, and prepared it for the four spacewalks that will be performed during STS-110.[1] First Quest-based EVA without a Space Shuttle at the station.
4 March
06:37
7 hours
1 minute
13:38 STS-109
Columbia
John M. Grunsfeld
Richard M. Linnehan
Removed the starboard solar array and replaced it with a new, smaller and more powerful third generation solar array. The old array was stowed in the payload bay for return to earth.[2] Hubble Space Telescope servicing
5 March
06:40
7 hours
16 minutes
13:56 STS-109
Columbia
James H. Newman
Michael J. Massimino
Removed the port solar array and replaced it with a new third generation solar array. The old array was stowed in the payload bay for return to earth. Removed and replaced the Reaction Wheel Assembly (RWA).[3] Hubble Space Telescope servicing
6 March
08:28
6 hours
48 minutes
15:16 STS-109
Columbia
John M. Grunsfeld
Richard M. Linnehan
The spacewalk was delayed 2 hours by a leak in Grunsfeld's spacesuit. The Power Control Unit (PCU) was removed and stowed for return to earth. A new, more powerful PCU, sized to match the more productive solar arrays, was installed.[4] Hubble Space Telescope servicing
7 March
09:00
7 hours
30 minutes
16:30 STS-109
Columbia
James H. Newman
Michael J. Massimino
Removed the Faint Object Camera from the aft shroud and installed the Advanced Camera for Surveys in the same location. After stowing the Faint Object Camera in the payload bay for return to earth, the Electronic Support Module was installed in the aft shroud.[5] Hubble Space Telescope servicing
8 March
08:46
7 hours
20 minutes
16:06 STS-109
Columbia
John M. Grunsfeld
Richard M. Linnehan
Installed an experimental Cryocooler for NICMOS inside the aft shroud of and connected it to the Electronic Support Module installed the day before. Installed the Cooling System Radiator and connected it to the NICMOS.[6] Hubble Space Telescope servicing
11 April
14:36
7 hours
48 minutes
22:24 STS-110
ISS Quest
Steven Smith
Rex J. Walheim
Began installing the S0 Truss onto Destiny, initial power and data connections installed between the station and S0, and installed two forward struts that permanently hold the truss in place.[7]
13 April
14:09
7 hours
30 minutes
21:39 STS-110
ISS Quest
Jerry L. Ross
Lee M.E. Morin
Continued S0 Truss installation, power and data cable connections installed between S0 and the station, and installed two aft struts that permanently hold the truss in place.[7]
14 April
13:48
6 hours
27 minutes
20:15 STS-110
ISS Quest
Steven Smith
Rex J. Walheim
Released the claw that was used in the initial attachment of the S0 Truss, installed connectors that will be used to route power to Canadarm2 when it is on the truss, released launch restraints from the Mobile Transporter, and removed a small thermal cover the Mobile Transporter's radiator.[7]
16 April
14:29
6 hours
37 minutes
21:06 STS-110
ISS Quest
Jerry L. Ross
Lee M.E. Morin
Pivoted the "Airlock Spur", which will be used by spacewalkers in the future as a path from the airlock to the truss, installed handrails onto S0, partially assembled a platform, and installed two floodlights.[7][8]
9 June
15:27
7 hours
14 minutes
22:41 STS-111
ISS Quest
Franklin Chang-Diaz
Philippe Perrin
Attached a Power Data Grapple Fixture to the P6 truss, removed debris panels from the payload bay and attached them to a temporary location on PMA-1, and removed thermal blankets to prepare the Mobile Base System for installation onto the station's Mobile Transporter.[9][10]
11 June
15:20
5 hours 20:20 STS-111
ISS Quest
Franklin Chang-Diaz
Philippe Perrin
Attached Mobile Base System to the Mobile Transporter, attached power, data and video cables from the station to the MBS.[9][11]
13 June
15:16
7 hours
17 minutes
22:33 STS-111
ISS Quest
Franklin Chang-Diaz
Philippe Perrin
Replaced Canadarm2's wrist roll joint, and stowed the old joint in the shuttle's payload bay to be returned to Earth.[9][12]
16 August
09:25
4 hours
23 minutes
13:48 Expedition 5
ISS Pirs
Valery Korzun
Peggy Whitson
Installed six micro meteoroid debris panels onto Zvezda.[13] Whitson became the 6th American and the 7th female spacewalker.
26 August
05:27
5 hours
21 minutes
10:48 Expedition 5
ISS Pirs
Valery Korzun
Sergei Treshchyov
Installed a frame on the outside of Zarya for spacewalk assembly tasks, installed new samples on a pair of Japanese Space Agency experiments housed on Zvezda, installed devices on Zvezda that would simplify the routing of tethers during future spacewalks, and installed two additional ham radio antennas on Zvezda.[13]
10 October
15:21
7 hours
1 minute
20:35 STS-112
ISS Quest
David Wolf
/Piers Sellers
Released launch locks that held the S1 truss radiators in place during launch, attached power, data and fluid lines between the S1 truss and S0, deployed the station's second S-Band communications system, installed the first of two external camera systems, and released launch restraints on the truss' mobile spacewalk workstation, Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA).[14][15]
12 October
14:31
6 hours
4 minutes
20:35 STS-112
ISS Quest
David Wolf
/Piers Sellers
Installed a second camera system, released more radiator launch locks, removed insulation covers on quick-disconnect fittings near the Z1 and P6 junction and to install Spool Positioning Devices, released starboard-side launch restraints on the CETA cart, and attached Ammonia Tank Assembly cables.[14][16]
14 October
14:08
6 hours
36 minutes
20:44 STS-112
ISS Quest
David Wolf
/Piers Sellers
Removed and replaced the Interface Umbilical Assembly on the station's Mobile Transporter, installed two jumpers that will allow ammonia coolant to flow between the S1 and S0 Trusses, released a drag link and stowed it, and installed Spool Positioning Devices (SPD) on ammonia lines.[14][17]
26 November
19:49
6 hours
45 minutes
27 November
02:34
STS-113
ISS Quest
Michael Lopez-Alegria
John Herrington
Initial installation of the P1 truss, installed connections between the P1 and the S0 truss, released launch restraints on the CETA cart, installed Spool Positioning Devices (SPDs) onto the station, removed a drag link on P1 that served as a launch restraint, and installed a Wireless video system External Transceiver Assembly onto the Unity node.[18][19]
28 November
18:36
6 hours
10 minutes
29 November
00:46
STS-113
ISS Quest
Michael Lopez-Alegria
John Herrington
nstalled fluid jumpers where the S0 and the P1 are attached to each other, removed the P1's starboard keel pin, installed another Wireless video system External Transceiver Assembly onto the P1, and relocated the CETA cart from the P1 to the S1 truss.[18][20]
30 November
19:25
7 hours 1 December
02:25
STS-113
ISS Quest
Michael Lopez-Alegria
John Herrington
Installed more Spool Positioning Devices, reconfigured electrical harnesses that route power through the Main Bus Switching Units, and attached Ammonia Tank Assembly lines.[18][21]

References

  • Kyle, Ed. "Space Launch Report". 
  • Wade, Mark. "Encyclopedia Astronautica". 
  • Krebs, Gunter. "Chronology of Space Launches". Gunter's Space Page. 
  • "Space Information Center". JAXA. 
  • McDowell, Jonathan. "Jonathan's Space Report". Jonathan's Space Page. 
  • "Mission Set Database". NASA GSFC. 
  • "NASASpaceFlight.com". 
  • "Launch Logs". Orbital Report News Agency. 
  • "Space Calendar". NASA JPL. 
  • "Southwest Space Archive". 
  • "Launch Forecast". Space.com. 
  • "Spaceflight Now". 
  • Pietrobon, Steven. "Steven Pietrobon's Space Archive". 
  • "U.S. Space Objects Registry". 
  • "Хроника освоения космоса ('Chronicle of space exploration')" (in Russian). Cosmoworld.ru. 
Generic references:

Footnotes

  1. ^ a b c NASA (2002). "Expedition Four Spacewalks". NASA. Archived from the original on 4 October 2008. Retrieved 21 October 2008. 
  2. ^ NASA (4 March 2002). "STS-109 Mission Status Report No. 8". NASA. Archived from the original on 13 February 2009. Retrieved 12 January 2009. 
  3. ^ NASA (5 March 2002). "STS-109 Mission Status Report No. 10". National Aeronautic and Space Administration. Archived from the original on 16 February 2009. Retrieved 12 January 2009. 
  4. ^ NASA (2002). "STS-109 Mission Status Report No. 12". National Aeronautic and Space Administration. Archived from the original on 13 February 2009. Retrieved 13 January 2009. 
  5. ^ NASA (2002). "STS-109 Mission Status Report No. 14". National Aeronautic and Space Administration. Archived from the original on 13 February 2009. Retrieved 13 January 2009. 
  6. ^ NASA (2002). "STS-109 Mission Status report No. 16". National Aeronautic and Space Administration. Archived from the original on 21 February 2009. Retrieved 13 January 2009. 
  7. ^ a b c d NASA (2002). "STS-110 Extravehicular Activities". NASA. Retrieved 21 October 2008. 
  8. ^ NASA (2002). "STS-110, Mission Control Center Status Report #17". NASA. Archived from the original on 6 November 2008. Retrieved 21 October 2008. 
  9. ^ a b c NASA (2002). "STS-111 Extravehicular Activities". NASA. Retrieved 21 October 2008. 
  10. ^ NASA (2002). "STS-111, Mission Control Center Status Report # 10". NASA. Archived from the original on 10 October 2008. Retrieved 21 October 2008. 
  11. ^ NASA (2002). "STS-111, Mission Control Center Status Report # 14". NASA. Archived from the original on 10 October 2008. Retrieved 21 October 2008. 
  12. ^ NASA (2002). "STS-111, Mission Control Center Status Report # 18". NASA. Archived from the original on 6 November 2008. Retrieved 21 October 2008. 
  13. ^ a b NASA (2002). "Expedition Five Spacewalks". NASA. Archived from the original on 4 October 2008. Retrieved 21 October 2008. 
  14. ^ a b c NASA (2002). "STS-112 Extravehicular Activities". NASA. Retrieved 21 October 2008. 
  15. ^ NASA (2002). "STS-112 Mission Control Center Status Report No. 7". NASA. Retrieved 21 October 2008. 
  16. ^ NASA (2002). "STS-112 Mission Control Center Status Report #11". NASA. Retrieved 21 October 2008. 
  17. ^ NASA (2002). "STS-112 Mission Control Center Status Report #15". NASA. Retrieved 21 October 2008. 
  18. ^ a b c NASA (2002). "STS-113 Extravehicular Activities". NASA. Retrieved 21 October 2008. 
  19. ^ NASA (2002). "STS-113 Mission Control Center Status Report # 7". NASA. Retrieved 21 October 2008. 
  20. ^ NASA (2002). "STS-113 Mission Control Center Status Report # 11". NASA. Retrieved 21 October 2008. 
  21. ^ NASA (2002). "STS-113 Mission Control Center Status Report # 15". NASA. Retrieved 21 October 2008. 


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