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Ali Mohsen al-Ahmar

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Ali Mohsen al-Ahmar

Ali Mohsen al-Ahmar
Native name علي محسن الأحمر
Born (1945-06-20) June 20, 1945
Sanhan, Sana'a Governorate, Mutawakkilite Kingdom of Yemen
Allegiance  Yemen
Service/branch Yemen Army
Rank Major General
Unit 1st Armored Division
Commands held North-Western Military District
1st Armored Division[1]
Battles/wars 1994 civil war in Yemen
2011 Yemeni revolution
Relations Ali Abdullah Saleh (Distant cousin)[2]

Ali Mohsen Saleh al-Ahmar sometimes spelled "Muhsin" (Arabic: علي محسن صالح الأحمر‎) (20 June 1945 -), is a major general and a business tycoon in Yemen.[3] Born in Sanhan, a southeastern suburb of Sana'a he is a distant cousin of Ali Abdullah Saleh.[4] Ali Mohsen was the commander of the northwestern military district and the 1st Armoured Division. He played a leading role in the creation of the Islamist Islah party with considerable financial backing from Saudi Arabia.[5]

Mohsen is known to have Yemen and Saudi Arabia.[10]

Relations between Saleh and Mohsen had reportedly soured years before the uprising due to his rivalries with two of the president's sons. This souring of relations led to an apparent attempt by the President Saleh to kill Mohsen by asking Saudi Arabian military commanders to bomb an alleged rebel base which was in fact Mohsen's HQ.[11] On March 21, 2011, al-Ahmar said he would protect the anti-government Yemeni protesters, along with other top Yemeni army commanders, in a move that was later condemned as 'mutinous' by President Saleh.[12] On December 19, 2012, al-Ahmar was effectively fired from his position by President Hadi as part of Hadi's efforts to restructure the military and remove the political and military elite remnant from former President Ali Abdullah Saleh's rule. The forces previously under al-Ahmar's command, most notably the First Armoured Division, will be absorbed into the Defence Ministry.[13]

See also

References

  1. ^ Yemen Order of Battle | American Enterprise Institute Critical Threats Project
  2. ^ Sarah Phillips (2008). Yemen's Democracy Experiment in Regional Perspective. Palgrave Macmillan. p. 52.  
  3. ^ Rebel' General Ali Mohsen al Ahmar, Yemen's back-up ruler after Saleh"'". The National. 24 March 2011. 
  4. ^ Sarah Phillips (2008). Yemen's Democracy Experiment in Regional Perspective. Palgrave Macmillan. p. 52.  
  5. ^ Sarah Phillips (2008). Yemen's Democracy Experiment in Regional Perspective. Palgrave Macmillan. p. 137.  
  6. ^ Barak A. Salmoni, Bryce Loidolt, Madeleine Wells (2010). Regime and Periphery in Northern Yemen The Huthi Phenomenon.  
  7. ^ Fawaz A. Gerges (2013). The New Middle East: Protest and Revolution in the Arab World. Cambridge University Press. p. 374.  
  8. ^ Mark Rice-Oxley (21 March 2011). "WikiLeaks cable links defecting Yemeni general to smuggling rackets". the Guardian. Retrieved 19 October 2014. 
  9. ^ Barak A. Salmoni, Bryce Loidolt, Madeleine Wells (2010). Regime and Periphery in Northern Yemen The Huthi Phenomenon.  
  10. ^ Mark Rice-Oxley (21 March 2011). "WikiLeaks cable links defecting Yemeni general to smuggling rackets". the Guardian. Retrieved 19 October 2014. 
  11. ^ "WikiLeaks: Yemen tricked Saudis into nearly bombing president's rival". The Guardian. 8 April 2011. 
  12. ^ "Top Yemeni general, Ali Mohsen, backs opposition". BBC News. 21 March 2011. 
  13. ^ Jamjoom, Mohammed and Almasmari, Hakim. "Yemen's president restructures armed forces". CNN. Retrieved 24 February 2013. 
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