World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article
 

Archducal hat

Drawing of the archducal hat
Margaret of Austria wearing her hat on her tomb by Conrad Meit
Painting of the archducal hat of Joseph II, Holy Roman Emperor

The archducal hat (German: Erzherzogshut) is the insignia of the Archduchy of Austria, mostly apparently symbolic and used in the heraldry and some portraits of Austrian archdukes rather than actually made and worn. One late example is kept in Klosterneuburg Monastery.

Contents

  • History 1
  • Symbolism 2
  • References 3
  • Literature 4
  • See also 5
  • External links 6

History

The first archducal coronet (Erzherzogskrone) was shown on a portrait of Rudolf IV, Duke of Austria, though this coronet probably never existed. Ernest the Iron (1377–1424) had a coronet made, and another was made on the death of Archduke Ferdinand II of the Tyrol in 1595.

The final crown of the Archduchy of Austria was made in 1616 for the regent of the Tyrol, Maximilian III. Its place of production remains unknown. It is kept at Klosterneuburg Monastery in Lower Austria. It was brought to Vienna in 1620 for the Ceremony of Homage by the Estates (the so-called Erbhuldigung) for the new ruler, and was last there in 1835. Margaret of Austria, aunt of Emperor Charles V and Regent of the Netherlands, is also shown wearing one on her tomb by Conrad Meit and in some images. Since one had to be made for her funeral she probably never wore a version while alive. Hers is a plain uncovered hoop with large zig-zag projections upwards.[1]

An Archducal Hat of Tyrol was made for Maximilian III, Archduke of Austria in 1602 and is kept as a votive offering at the church of Mariastein in Tyrol. Another example was made for Joseph II in 1764 for his coronation as Holy Roman Emperor in Frankfurt, of which only the metal frame remains today.

Another insignia of the Habsburg rulers is the ducal hat of Styria, kept in the Landesmuseum Joanneum in Graz, Styria.

Symbolism

Coat of arms of Upper Austria crowned with the archducal hat

The coat of arms of the federal state of Upper Austria features the archducal hat on the top. It formerly appeared on the coat of arms of Lower Austria, until 1918.

References

  1. ^ Burk, Jens Ludwig, "Conrat Meit, Margaret of Austria's Court Sculptor in Malines and Brou", pp. 15-16, PDF version, Centre des monuments nationaux (France)

Literature

  • G. Kugler, Der österreichische Erzherzogshut und die Erbhuldigung, in: Der heilige Leopold, Ausstellungskatalog, Klosterneuburg 1985.

See also

External links

Media related to at Wikimedia Commons

  • AEIOU | Erzherzogshut
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.