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Ariana Afghan Airlines

Ariana Afghan Airlines
دآريانا افغان هوايي شرکت
IATA ICAO Callsign
FG AFG ARIANA
Founded 27 January 1955 (1955-01-27)
Hubs Kabul International Airport
Secondary hubs Kandahar International Airport
Frequent-flyer program Reward Club[1]
Fleet size 7
Destinations 11
Parent company Pashtany Bank
Headquarters Kabul, Afghanistan
Key people
Website .com.flyarianawww

Ariana Afghan Airlines Co. Ltd. (Persian: هواپیمایی آریانا‎‎, Pashto: آريانا افغان هوايي شرکت‎), also known as Ariana, is the largest airline of Afghanistan and serves as the country's national carrier.[3] Founded in 1955, Ariana is the oldest airline of Afghanistan. The company has its main base at Kabul International Airport, from where it operates domestically, and also provides international connections that link Afghanistan with China, Germany, India, Iran, Pakistan, Russia, Saudi Arabia, and Turkey.[4] The carrier is headquartered in Shāre Naw, Kabul,[5][6] and it is wholly owned by the Afghan government.

Ariana Afghan Airlines has been on the list of air carriers banned in the European Union since October 2006 (2006-10).

Contents

  • History 1
    • Early years 1.1
    • Taliban era 1.2
    • Post-Taliban era 1.3
    • EU ban 1.4
  • Destinations 2
  • Fleet 3
    • Historic 3.1
  • Accidents and incidents 4
  • See also 5
  • References 6
  • Further reading 7
  • External links 8

History

Early years

An Ariana Afghan Airlines DC-10-30 is seen here on approach to London Heathrow Airport in 1980. Throughout its history, the airline operated a single aircraft of the type that was sold in the mid-1980s, following the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan.[7]

The airline was set up on 27 January 1955.[8] It was established as Aryana Airlines with the assistance of Indamer Co. Ltd., which initially held a 49% interest, and the government of Afghanistan owned the balance.[9] At the beginning, services were operated to Bahrain, India, Iran, and Lebanon, with a fleet of three Douglas DC-3s.[9] In 1957, Pan American World Airways became the minor shareholder of the airline when it took over the 49% interest from Indamer.[10] Domestic scheduled services started the same year.[10] By April 1960 (1960-04), a fleet of three DC-3s was being used for linking Kabul with Amritsar, Delhi, Jeddah, and Karachi, as well as with some points within Afghanistan, while a single DC-4 operated the Kabul–Kandahar–TehranDamascusBeirutAnkaraPragueFrankfurt service, so-called “Marco Polo” route.[10] In the early 1960s, US$1,100,000 ($8,769,066 in 2016) from US aid to Afghanistan was used to capitalise the company.[11]

By March 1970 (1970-03), the airline had 650 employees. At this time, the fleet comprised one Boeing 727-100C, one CV-440, one DC-3 and two Douglas DC-6s that worked on routes serving the Middle East, India, Pakistan, the USSR, and Istanbul, Frankfurt and London.[12] Domestic services were then operated by Bakhtar Alwatana, which was established by the government in 1967 to this specific purpose.[13]

The carrier's first widebody aircraft, a McDonnell Douglas DC-10-30, entered the fleet in early October 1979 (1979-10).[14] By March 1985 (1985-03), the aircraft fleet consisted of the DC-10 and two Boeing 727-100Cs.[15] In the mid-1980s, during the Soviet-Afghan War, the carrier was forced to sell the DC-10 to British Caledonian, as the Soviets wanted the carrier to fly the Tupolev Tu-154 as a replacement.[7] In October 1985 (1985-10), Ariana was taken over by Bakhtar, which became the country's new national airline.[13][16] In 1986, Bakhtar ordered two Tupolev Tu-154Ms;[17] the airline took possession of these aircraft in April 1987 (1987-04).[16] In February 1988 (1988-02), Bakhtar was merged back into Ariana, thus creating an airline which could serve both short and long haul routes.[18]

Taliban era

After the end of the Soviet war in 1989 and collapse of Najibullah's government, the Taliban took over Kabul in 1996. Afghanistan faced substantial economic sanctions from the international sector during the Taliban regime. The sanctions, along with the Taliban government's control of the company and the grounding of many of the carrier's international flights, had a devastating effect on the economic health of the company through the 1990s. The fleet was reduced to only a handful of Russian and Ukrainian built An-26s, Yakovlev Yak-40s and three Boeing 727s, which were used on the longest domestic routes. In October 1996, Pakistan provided a temporary maintenance and operational base at Karachi. With no overseas assets, by 1999 Ariana's international operations consisted of flights to Dubai only;[19] also, limited cargo flights continued into China's western provinces. However, sanctions imposed by UN Security Council Resolution 1267 forced the airline company to suspend overseas operations. In November 2001 (2001-11), the airline was grounded completely.[20]

According to the Los Angeles Times:[21]

With the Taliban's blessing, Bin Laden effectively had hijacked Ariana, the national civilian airline of Afghanistan. For four years, according to former U.S. aides and exiled Afghan officials, Ariana's passenger and charter flights ferried Islamic militants, arms, cash and opium through the United Arab Emirates and Pakistan. Members of Bin Laden's Al Qaeda terrorist network were provided false Ariana identification that gave them free run of airports in the Middle East.

According to people interviewed by the Los Angeles Times, Viktor Bout's companies helped in running the airline.[22]

Post-Taliban era

An Ariana Afghan Airlines Airbus A300B4-200 on approach to Dubai International Airport in 2004. With registration YA-BAD, this aircraft was written off as a result of an overrun episode at Atatürk Airport in March 2007 (2007-03).[23][24]

Following the overthrow of the Taliban government during Operation Enduring Freedom, Ariana began to rebuild its operations in December 2001 (2001-12).[25][26] About a month later, the UN sanctions were finally lifted, permitting the airline to resume international routes again.[27] In 2002, the government of India gave the carrier a gift of three ex-Air India Airbus A300s.[28][29][30] Ariana's first international passenger flight since 1999 landed at Indira Gandhi International Airport in January 2002 (2002-01),[31] followed by routes to Pakistan and Germany in June and October the same year, respectively.[32][33][34] In 2005, India signed an agreement on aviation cooperation with Afghanistan, with Air India training some 50 officials for Ariana.[35]

EU ban

Due to safety regulations, Ariana was mostly banned from flying into European Union airspace in March 2006 (2006-03), with the European Commission allowing the carrier to fly only a single France-registered Airbus A310 into the member states;[36][37] the ban was extended to the entire fleet in October of that year.[38] The ban was confirmed in subsequent updates of the list released in late 2009[39] and March 2010 (2010-03).[40] In November 2010 (2010-11), all Afghanistan-registered aircraft were banned from operating in the European Union.[41][42] Ariana was still included in the six latest updates of the list, released in April 2012 (2012-04),[43] December 2012 (2012-12),[44] July 2013 (2013-07),[45] December 2013 (2013-12),[46] April 2014 (2014-04),[47] and December 2014 (2014-12).[48]

Destinations

As of August 2014, Ariana Afghan Airlines serves three domestic points and seven international destinations; most of the routes radiate from Kabul.[49]

Fleet

An Ariana Afghan Airlines Airbus A310-300 on short final to Sheremetyevo Airport in 2010.

The Ariana Afghan Airlines fleet consists of the following aircraft, as of July 2015:[50]

Historic

An Ariana Afghan Airlines Boeing 727-200 Advanced at Atatürk International Airport in 2006.

Ariana operated the following equipment all through its history:[51]

Accidents and incidents

According to Aviation Safety Network, as of October 2012 Ariana Afghan Airlines has written off 19 aircraft involved in 13 events, seven of them being deadly. Casualties totaled 154 souls.[52] The following list includes occurrences that led to at least one fatality, resulted in a write-off of the aircraft involved, or both.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Reward Club Card". Ariana Afghan Airlines. Retrieved 16 April 2012. 
  2. ^ a b "About Ariana Afghan Airlines". Ariana Afghan Airlines.  Archived 5 August 2015 at the Wayback Machine
  3. ^ "EU To Impose Ban On Afghan Planes". Airwise News. 22 November 2010. Archived from the original on 5 March 2012. Retrieved 16 April 2012. Kabul-based  
  4. ^ "Route Map". Ariana Afghan Airlines. Retrieved 16 April 2012. 
  5. ^ "Contact Us." (Archive) Ariana Afghan Airlines. Retrieved on April 30, 2013. "Ariana Afghan Airlines (Corporate Headquarters) Char-Rahi Shaheed, Shahr-e-Naw, P.O.Box # 76, Kabul, Afghanistan"
  6. ^ "Contact Us – Our Offices". Ariana Afghan Airlines. Archived from the original on 16 April 2012. Retrieved 16 April 2012.  "P.O. Box 76, Kabul, Afghanistan"
  7. ^ a b "USSR forced Ariana DC-10 sale".  
  8. ^ "Addendum – Ariana Afghan Airlines".  
  9. ^ a b "World airline directory – Aryana Airlines Co., Ltd.".  
  10. ^ a b c "Airlines of the world – Ariana Afghan Airlines Co Ltd".  
  11. ^ "Brevities".  
  12. ^ a b "World airlines 1970 – Ariana Afghan Airlines Co Ltd".  
  13. ^ a b "World airline directory – Bakhtar Afghan Airlines".  
  14. ^ "Air transport".  
  15. ^ "World airline directory – Ariana Afghan Airlines".  
  16. ^ a b "Market place".  
  17. ^ "Market place".  
  18. ^ "World airline directory – Ariana Afghan Airlines".  
  19. ^ Crossette, Barbara (7 October 1999). "U.S. Presses Security Council for Sanctions Against the Taliban".  
  20. ^  
  21. ^
    • Brown, Stephen; Pasternak, Judy (18 November 2001). "Long Before Sept. 11, Bin Laden Aircraft Flew Under the Radar (page 1 of 5)".  
    • "Long Before Sept. 11, Bin Laden Aircraft Flew Under the Radar (page 2 of 5)". Archived from the original on 26 August 2012. Retrieved 26 August 2012. 
    • "Long Before Sept. 11, Bin Laden Aircraft Flew Under the Radar (page 3 of 5)". Archived from the original on 26 August 2012. Retrieved 26 August 2012. 
    • "Long Before Sept. 11, Bin Laden Aircraft Flew Under the Radar (page 4 of 5)". Archived from the original on 26 August 2012. Retrieved 26 August 2012. 
    • "Long Before Sept. 11, Bin Laden Aircraft Flew Under the Radar (page 5 of 5)". Archived from the original on 26 August 2012. Retrieved 26 August 2012. 
  22. ^ "On the Trail of a Man Behind Taliban's Air Fleet".   Archived 11 August at WebCite
  23. ^ a b
  24. ^ a b "Pictures: Ariana A300 skids off Istanbul runway".  
  25. ^ George, Marcus (12 December 2001). "Afghan airline battles for the skies".  
  26. ^ Johnston, Alan (4 December 2001). "Afghan airline returns to the skies".  
  27. ^ "Expansion under way as Ariana takes A300".  
  28. ^ "India gifts third airbus to Afghanistan".  
  29. ^ Ionides, Nicholas (23 July 2002). "Ariana set to take delivery of first Indian A300".  
  30. ^ "India offers planes to Afghan airline". BBC News. 9 May 2002. Archived from the original on 19 August 2012. Retrieved 19 August 2012. 
  31. ^ "Ariana resumes operations with New Delhi flight".  
  32. ^ "Ariana Afghan back on Western Europe route".  
  33. ^ "Routes".  
  34. ^ "Indo-Afghan ties touch new high".  
  35. ^ "Painted Black: a study of the EU unsafe airlines ban".   Archived 16 October 2014 at the Wayback Machine
  36. ^ Straus, Brian (23 March 2006). "Africa bears brunt of European Union blacklist".  
  37. ^ Buyck, Cathy (13 October 2006). "EC updates blacklist".  
  38. ^ "Other News - 12/01/2009".  
  39. ^ "New EU blacklist features Iran Air, Philippine carriers".  
  40. ^ Buyck, Cathy (24 October 2010). "New airlines added to EU blacklist".  
  41. ^ Hofmann, Kurt (23 November 2010). "EC bans Afghan airlines from European airspace".  
  42. ^ "List of air carriers of which all operations are subject to a ban within the EU".  
  43. ^ "List of airlines banned within the EU".  
  44. ^
    • "List of airlines banned within the EU".  
    • "Aviation safety: Commission updates the European safety list of banned airlines" (Press release). European Commission. 10 July 2013. Archived from the original (PDF) on 11 July 2013. 
  45. ^
    • "List of airlines banned within the EU".  
    • "Aviation: Commission updates the European safety list of banned airlines" (Press release). European Commission. 5 December 2013. Archived from the original (PDF) on 6 December 2013. 
  46. ^
    • "List of airlines banned within the EU".  
    • "Aviation: Commission updates the European safety list of banned airlines" (Press release). European Commission. 10 April 2014. Archived from the original (PDF) on 11 April 2014. 
  47. ^
    • "List of airlines banned within the EU" (PDF). European Commission. 11 December 2014. Archived from the original (PDF) on 21 December 2014. 
    • "Aviation: Commission updates the EU air safety list" (PDF) (Press release). European Commission. 11 December 2014. Archived from the original (PDF) on 21 December 2014. 
  48. ^ "Ariana Afghan Airlines frontpage".  Archived 10 August 2014 at the Wayback Machine
  49. ^ "Ariana Afghan Airlines - Fleet". Ariana Afghan Airlines.  Archived 3 July 2015 at the Wayback Machine
  50. ^ "Profile for: Ariana Afghan Airlines". AeroTransport Data Bank. 24 August 2012. Archived from the original on 25 August 2012. Retrieved 26 December 2012. 
  51. ^ "Ariana Afghan Airlines accident record". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 22 October 2012. 
  52. ^ Accident description for YA-AAD at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 24 August 2012.
  53. ^ Accident description for YA-BAG at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 24 August 2012.
  54. ^ Accident description for YA-FAR at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 3 October 2012.
  55. ^ Accident description for YA-AAB at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 10 October 2012.
  56. ^ Accident description at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 28 August 2012.
  57. ^ Accident description for YA-BAK at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 28 August 2012.
  58. ^ Accident description for YA-TAP at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 28 August 2012.
  59. ^ Accident description for YA-BAN at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 27 September 2012.
  60. ^ Accident description for YA-KAE at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 27 September 2012.
  61. ^ Accident description for YA-KAE at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 27 August 2012.
  62. ^ Accident description for YA-FAZ at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 27 August 2012.
  63. ^ "Ariana Afghan crash".   Archived 11 August 2014 at the Wayback Machine
  64. ^ Accident description for YA-DAA at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 24 August 2012.
  65. ^ Accident description for YA-DAB at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 24 August 2012.
  66. ^ Accident description at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 24 August 2012.
  67. ^ Accident description for YA-DAH at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 24 August 2012.
  68. ^ Accident description for YA-DAJ at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 24 August 2012.
  69. ^ Accident description for YA-FAU at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 24 August 2012.
  70. ^ Accident description for YA-FAW at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 24 August 2012.
  71. ^ Accident description for YA-BAD at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 24 August 2012.
  72. ^ Accident description for YA-PID at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 8 May 2014.
  73. ^ "Ariana A300 overruns while landing at Istanbul Ataturk".  

Further reading

External links

Official website
  • Ariana Afghan Airlines
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