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Aztec philosophy

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Aztec philosophy

Aztec philosophy was the school of philosophy developed by the Aztec Empire. The Aztecs had a well-developed school of philosophy, perhaps the most developed in the Americas and in many ways comparable to Greek philosophy, even amassing more texts than the ancient Greeks.[1] Aztec philosophy focused on dualism, monism, and aesthetics, and Aztec philosophers attempted to answer the main Aztec philosophical question of how to gain stability and balance in an ephemeral world.

Beliefs

Aztec philosophy saw the concept of Ometeotl as a unity that underlies the universe. Ometeotl forms, shapes, and is all things. Even things in opposition—light and dark, life and death—were seen as expressions of the same unity, Ometeotl. The belief in a unity with dualistic expressions compares with similar dialectical monist ideas in both Western and Eastern philosophies.[2]

Relation to Aztec religion

Aztec priests had a panentheistic view of religion but the popular Aztec religion maintained polytheism. Priests saw the different gods as aspects of the singular and transcendent unity of teotl but the masses were allowed to practice polytheism without understanding the true, unified nature of the Aztec gods.[2]

Moral beliefs and aesthetics

Aztec philosophers focused on morality as establishing balance. The world was seen as constantly shifting with the ever-changing teotl. Morality focused on finding the path to living a balanced life, which would provide stability in the shifting world.[2]

Aztec philosophy saw the arts as a way to express the true nature of teotl.[2] Art was considered to be good if it in some way brought about a better understanding of teotl.[2] Aztec poetry was closely tied to philosophy and often used to express philosophic concepts.[2][3] Below is an example of such a poem, translated from the original Nahuatl:

No one comes on this earth to stay
Our bodies are like rose trees -
They grow petals then wither and die.
But our hearts are like grass in the springtime,
They live on and forever grow green again.

See also

External links

  • The Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy: Aztec philosophy—by James Maffie
  • JAMES MAFFIE, Aztec Philosophy: Understanding a World in Motion, 2014 : NDPReview.

References

  1. ^ Mann, Charles C. 1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2005. p, 121.
  2. ^ a b c d e f Maffie, James. "Aztec Philosophy." Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy. 2005. [1]
  3. ^ Mann, 122-123
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