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Battōjutsu

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Title: Battōjutsu  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Kage-ryū, Japanese martial arts, Toyama-ryū, Tenshin Shōden Katori Shintō-ryū, Kenjutsu
Collection: Japanese Swordsmanship, Koryu Bujutsu, Samurai
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Battōjutsu

Battōjutsu
抜刀術
Focus Weaponry
Hardness Non-competitive
Country of origin Japan
Creator -
Parenthood To-ho (Sword method)
Kenjutsu (Sword craft)
Olympic sport No

Battōjutsu (抜刀術 battō-jutsu) ("the craft of drawing out the sword") is an old term for iaijutsu. Battōjutsu is often used interchangeably with the terms iaijutsu and battō.[1]

Generally, battōjutsu is practiced as a part of a classical ryū and is closely integrated with the tradition of kenjutsu and is practice with the live-blade, katana, often as simply the sole, kata.[1] The training is for combative effectiveness,[2] through factors such as distancing, timing and targeting. As such, battōjutsu is not intended for sportslike or "spiritual" purposes as are modern budo like iaido and kendo.[3]

List of schools

Old school:

Modern schools developed after the beginning of the Edo era:

  • Matsumata-ryū, founded in 1750 by Matsumata Keisuke
  • Toyama-ryū, founded in 1925 by Nakamura Taisaburo[4]
  • Nakamura-ryū, founded by Nakamura Taizaburō in the mid-20th century, who had previously taught Toyama-ryū[5]

References

  1. ^ a b Armstrong, Hunter B. (1995) "The Koryu Bujutsu Experience" in Koryu Bujutsu: Classical Warrior Traditions of Japan (ed. Diane Skoss). Koryu Books. Page 32. ISBN 1-890536-04-0
  2. ^ Armstrong, Hunter B. (1995) "The Koryu Bujutsu Experience" in Koryu Bujutsu: Classical Warrior Traditions of Japan (ed. Diane Skoss). Koryu Books. Page 33. ISBN 1-890536-04-0
  3. ^ Armstrong, Hunter B. (1995) "The Koryu Bujutsu Experience" in Koryu Bujutsu: Classical Warrior Traditions of Japan (ed. Diane Skoss). Koryu Books. Page 31. ISBN 1-890536-04-0
  4. ^ Draeger, Donn F. (1974) Modern Bujutsu & Budo: The Martial Arts and Ways of Japan (Vol. III). New York: Weatherhill. Page 65. ISBN 0-8348-0351-8
  5. ^ Draeger, Donn F. (1974) Modern Bujutsu & Budo: The Martial Arts and Ways of Japan (Vol. III). New York: Weatherhill. Page 67. ISBN 0-8348-0351-8
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