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Bhagadatta

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Title: Bhagadatta  
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Subject: Kalinga Kingdom, Kirata Kingdom, Vanga Kingdom, Glossary of Hinduism terms, Dighalipukhuri
Collection: Characters in the Mahabharata
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Bhagadatta

Krishna Storms the Citadel of Naraka - showing Prince Bhagadatta and his grandmother offering prayers to Krishna.
Arjuna shots Bhagadatta.

Bhagadatta was the son of Naraka, king of the Pragjyotisha Kingdom and second in line of kings of Naraka dynasty. He was succeeded by his son Vajradatta.

Contents

  • Mahabharata war 1
  • Descent 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4

Mahabharata war

In the Battle of Kurukshetra, Bhagadatta fought on the side of the Kauravas. He was very well known to attack his enemies with his elephant in the warfare. On the 12th day of the war, he was involved in a fierce battle with Arjuna on his elephant World Elephant Supratika. During the course of this battle, Bhagadatta fired an irresistible weapon called Vaishnavastra on Arjuna.[1] But, Arjuna was saved from death by the timely intervention of Krishna. Krishna let himself to be cushion for that potent weapon, which turned into a garland and fell on Krishna.[1] Finally, Bhagadatta was killed from a lethal arrow shot by Arjuna.[2][3]

Descent

In Kalika Purana, Harshacharita, Puranas and in other epics; Naraka said to have sons namely Bhagadatta, Mahasirsa, Madavan and Sumali. Vajradatta and Pushpadatta are sons of Bhagadatta.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Menon, Ramesh (2006) The Mahabharata: A Modern Rendering iUniverse, Inc., New York, page 231-232, ISBN 978-0-595-40187-1
  2. ^ "Bhagadatta - King of Pragjyotisha - Indian Mythology". 
  3. ^ "The Mahābhārata, Book 6: Bhishma Parva: Bhagavat-Gita Parva: Section LXIV". 


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