World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Cat lady

Article Id: WHEBN0024727796
Reproduction Date:

Title: Cat lady  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: List of stock characters, Crash & Bernstein, Stock characters, Mythological king, Dark Lady (character)
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Cat lady

A cat lady is a single woman who dotes upon her cat or cats. The term is usually considered pejorative,[1] though it is sometimes embraced.[2]

Usage and association

Women who own cats have long been associated with the concept of spinsterhood. In more recent decades, the concept of a cat lady has been associated with "romance-challenged (often career-oriented) women".[1]

A cat lady may also be an animal hoarder who keeps large numbers of cats without having the ability to properly house or care for them.[3] They may be ignorant about their situation.

Cat Ladies documentary

The 2009 documentary Cat Ladies tells the stories of four women whose lives have become dedicated to their cats. The film was directed by Christie Callan-Jones and produced by Chocolate Box Entertainment, originally for TVOntario. It was an official selection at the 2009 Hot Docs Festival, Silverdocs Festival, and San Francisco's DocFest.[4][5]

Naftali Berrill, Ph.D., Director of the New York Center for Neuropsychology and Forensic Behavioral Science told AOL Health, "These may be people who have a very hard time expressing themselves to other people. They may find the human need for affection is met most easily through a relationship with a pet." This devotion can sometimes signal mental or emotional issues such as depression.[6]

Crazy Cat Lady Syndrome

Recent research indicates a link between the parasite T. gondii, which sexually reproduces exclusively in cats, and numerous psychiatric conditions, including OCD.[7] The compulsive hoarding of cats, a symptom of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), has long been associated with "crazy cat ladies".[8] Mass media has drawn on this stereotype to coin the term Crazy Cat Lady Syndrome to refer to the association between T. gondii and psychiatric conditions.[7]

Famous cat ladies and their cats

  • Bertha Rand was Winnipeg's notorious Cat Lady, who for years battled her neighbours and city hall to save her dozens of cats. Even years after her death, she still holds a place in Canadian popular culture. Maureen Hunter's play The Queen of Queen Street is based on Rand's life.[11]

In popular culture

Cat ladies in popular culture include:

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Kiri Blakeley (15 Oct 2009), "Crazy Cat Ladies", Forbes 
  2. ^ Mark Ramirez (5 Aug 2009), "Do you believe in the Crazy Cat Lady?", timesunion.com 
  3. ^ Davis, Susan; Flaherty (illus), Jake (2002), "Prosecuting Animal Hoarders is like Herding Cats", California Lawyer (September): 26, 28, 29, 67, retrieved June 26, 2011 
  4. ^ Cat Ladies - When cats mean "meow" to you than people
  5. ^ Cat Ladies at the Internet Movie Database
  6. ^ Huso, Deborah (November 2009). "Some Live Among Hundreds of Cats". AOL Health. Retrieved November 2009. 
  7. ^ a b "How Your Cat Is Making You Crazy - Kathleen McAuliffe". The Atlantic. 2012-02-06. Retrieved 2013-06-03. 
  8. ^ D.J. Moran and Jennifer L. Patterson (2011-06-16). "When More Isn't Enough". Psychology Today. 
  9. ^ Celebrity cat lovers
  10. ^ Sally Quinn on life in Grey Gardens, W magazine, April 8, 2009
  11. ^ http://www.signature-editions.com/books/single_title/the_queen_of_queen_street
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.