China Coast Guard

中国海警
China Coast Guard
Ensign of the China Coast Guard.
Country People's Republic of China
Branch State Oceanic Administration (Since 2013)
Type Coast Guard
Insignia
Flag

The China Coast Guard (Chinese: 中国海警) serves as a coordinating agency for maritime search and rescue and law enforcement in the territorial waters of the People's Republic of China. The China Coast Guard was formerly the maritime branch of the Public Security Border Troops (Chinese: 公安边防部队), a paramilitary police force under the leadership of the Ministry of Public Security (MPS). In March 2013, China announced it would form a unified Coast Guard commanded by the State Oceanic Administration.[1]

Contents

  • Function 1
    • Roles 1.1
    • Command 1.2
    • Training 1.3
  • Equipment 2
    • Vessels 2.1
    • Nomenclature 2.2
  • Law enforcement deployments to waters around Diaoyu Islands 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

Function

The CCG is known to perform mostly coastal and oceanic search and rescue or patrols, including anti-smuggling operations. During wartime it may be placed under the operational control of the People's Liberation Army Navy.

Roles

Roles of the CCG are diverse but include:

  • Patrol of territorial waters and disputed territories
  • Anti-smuggling, anti-piracy
  • Maritime policing and ship inspections
  • Harbour and coastal security
  • Research and survey
  • Search and Rescue
  • Fisheries protection

Command

The Chinese Coast Guard was not under an independent command until 2013. Formally they were part of the armed police, under the local (provincial) border defense force command. The largest operational unit of the CCG is a CCG flotilla, which is a regimental-level unit in China’s military administrative hierarchy. Every coastal province has 1 to 3 Coast Guard flotillas. Currently there are twenty CCG flotillas across the country:

  • Fujian
    • 1st Flotilla - Fuzhou
    • 2nd Flotilla - Quanzhou
    • 3rd Flotilla - Xiamen
  • Guangdong
    • 1st Flotilla - Guangzhou
    • 2nd Flotilla - Shantou
    • 3rd Flotilla - Zhanjiang
  • Guangxi
    • 1st Flotilla - Beihai
    • 2nd Flotilla - Fangchenggang
  • Hainan
    • 1st Flotilla - Haikou
    • 2nd Flotilla - Sanya
  • Hebei with 1 Flotilla - Qinhuangdao
  • Jiangsu with 1 Flotilla - Taicang
  • Liaoning
    • 1st Flotilla - Dalian
    • 2nd Flotilla - Dandong
  • Shandong
    • 1st Flotilla - Weihai
    • 2nd Flotilla - Qingdao
  • Shanghai with 1 Flotilla - Shanghai
  • Tianjin with 1 Flotilla - Tianjin
  • Zhejiang
    • 1st Flotilla - Taizhou
    • 2nd Flotilla - Ningbo

Training

The Chinese Coast Guard conducts periodic joint-training sessions with other navies, including the US Coast Guard service.[2] The Chinese Coast Guard also participates in the annual North Pacific Coast Guard Agencies Forum in Alaska, along with US, Canadian, Japanese, South Korean, and Russian Coast Guards. As part of an exchange program, members of the Chinese Coast Guard service have been assigned to serve on U.S. Coast Guard cutters.[3]

Equipment

The CCG has received quite a few large patrol ships that would significantly enhance their operations. Hai Guan(customs), militia, police and other services operate hundreds of small patrol craft. For maritime patrol services, these craft are usually quite well armed with machine guns and 37mm AA guns. In addition, these services operate their own small aviation units to assist their maritime patrol capabilities. CCG operates a handful of Harbin Z-9 helicopters, and a maritime patrol aircraft based on the Harbin Y-12 STOL transport.

Vessels

Chinese Coast Guard ships are painted white with blue stripe and wording China Coast Guard in English and Chinese.

Typical Coast Guard ships include the 130 ton Type 218 patrol boat (100 boats), armed with twin 14.5mm machine guns, assorted speedboats, and few larger patrol ships. Up until very recently, the largest ship in Chinese Coast Guard service was the 1,500 ton Type 718 cutter (31101 Pudong).

In March 2007, it was reported that the PLAN has transferred 2 Type 728 cutter (44102,ex-509 Changde;46103,ex-510 Shaoxing) to the Coast Guard as and re-numbered 1002 & 1003. These ships are the largest vessels in the Coast Guard inventory.

Other boats include:

Nomenclature

Just like the People's Liberation Army Navy (PLAN), CCG share the same distinct difference between it and most western equivalent, which is that unlike its western counterparts, CCG does not use ship prefixes internally. However, a system of ship prefixes similar to that of west has been developed by many internet sources for similar classification:

Country Service Prefix Meaning
 People's Republic of China People's Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) PLANS People's Liberation Army Navy Ship: Commissioned ships in PLAN, mostly warships & some auxiliaries. China does not use ship prefixes internally.
PRCNS People's Republic of China Naval Ship: PLAN owned ships manned by civilians, including most research ships. China does not use ship prefixes internally.
China Coast Guard (PRCCG) PRCCGS People's Republic of China Coast Guard Ship. China does not use ship prefixes internally.
Governmental Agencies PRCS People's Republic of China Ship: ships owned by various Chinese governmental administrative and regulatory bodies, all of which are subject to naval deployment. China does not use ship prefixes internally.
Merchant Marine PRCMV People's Republic of China Merchant Vessel. China does not use ship prefixes internally.

Law enforcement deployments to waters around Diaoyu Islands

According to the State Oceanic Administration of China, the following operations in waters around Diaoyu Islands have been carried out by the China Coast Guard: -

Ordinal Time CCG's Ships CCG's Operations JCG's Operations and Reaction of Japanese Government
Deployments since July 2013 (new CCG established)
1 July 26, 2013 CCG-2350, CCG-2101, CCG-2506, CCG-2166 Patrolled and demonstrated against JCG ships[6] Patrolled and enforced a law on CCG ships. JCG ships requested CCG ships to leave.[7]
2 August 2, 2013 CCG-2350, CCG-2101, CCG-2506, CCG-2166 Patrolled and demonstrated against JCG ships. Escorted Chinese voyager Zhai Mo sailing his Jiangtaigong yacht all the way down to Senkaku/Diaoyu Island (the largest island of Senkaku/Diaoyu Islands) within 3 nm, resisted JCG ships. CCG ships helped Jiangtaigong refill feul after the yacht ran out of oil.[8][9][10] Patrolled and enforced a law on CCG ships. The chair of the Asian and Oceanian Affairs Bureau of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan Junichi Ihara protested to Han Zhiqiang, the Chinese envoy to Japan.[11]
3 August 7, 2013 CCG-2350, CCG-1126, CCG-2102, CCG-2166 Patrolled and demonstrated against JCG ships.[12] Monitored for 28 hours 36 minutes and interfered with Japanese fisher boats with Japanese citizen on board.[13] Patrolled and enforced a law on CCG ships. The chair of the Asian and Oceanian Affairs Bureau of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan Junichi Ihara called Han Zhiqiang, the Chinese envoy to Japan, and protested "China's intrusion". Han Zhiqiang refused the protest and requested Japanese ships to leave China claiming territorial waters around Senkaku/Diaoyu Islands immediately.[14]
4 August 10, 2013 CCG-2350, CCG-1126, CCG-2102, CCG-2146 Patrolled and demonstrated against JCG ships.[15] Patrolled and enforced a law on CCG ships. JCG ships requested the CCG ships to leave Japan claiming territorial watars and intercepted a Chinese boat that attempted to approach the island.[16]
5 August 16, 2013 CCG-2151, CCG-2146, CCG-2102, CCG-1126, CCG-1123 (joined later), CCG-2113 (joined later) Patrolled and demonstrated against JCG ships.[17][18] Patrolled and enforced a law on CCG ships. JCG ships requested the CCG ships to leave the area.[19]
6 August 27, 2013 CCG-2151, CCG-2146, CCG-2113 Patrolled and demonstrated against JCG ships.[20] Patrolled and enforced a law on CCG ships. JCG ships requested CCG ships to leave.[21]
7 September 6, 2013 CCG-2350, CCG-1115, CCG-2112, CCG-2506 Patrolled and demonstrated against JCG ships.[22]

[23]

Patrolled and enforced a law on CCG ships. JCG ships requested CCG ships to leave. The CCG ships did not respond.[24]
8 September 10, 2013 CCG-2350, CCG-1115, CCG-1126, CCG-2112, CCG-2113, CCG-2146, CCG 2506 Patrolled and demonstrated against JCG ships.[25][26] Patrolled and enforced a law on CCG ships. Japanese Defense Minister Itsunori Onodera orders Japanese troops to "boost alertness" as the "anniversary of the nationalization of Senkaku Islands" approaches. He warns against "Chinese naval and aerial provocations".

According CCG central command's screen, JCG sent 9 ships to intercept: PL-03 "Isokko", PLH-08 "Tsugaru", PL-61 "Hateruma", PL-62 "Ishigaki", PL-103 "Wakasa", PL-104 "Kii", PL-117 "Rebun", PL-125 "Katori", PL-126 "Kunigami".[27]

9 September 14, 2013 CCG-2350, CCG-1115, CCG-2112, CCG-2506 Patrolled and demonstrated against JCG ships.[28] Patrolled and enforced a law on CCG ships. JCG ships warned CCG ships to leave.[29]
10 September 19, 2013 CCG-2350, CCG-2506 Patrolled and demonstrated against JCG ships.[30] Patrolled and enforced a law on CCG ships. JCG ships warned CCG ships to leave.[31]
11 September 27, 2013 CCG-2151, CCG-1126, CCG-2146, CCG-2113 Patrolled and demonstrated against JCG ships.[32] Patrolled and enforced a law on CCG ships. JCG ships warned CCG ships to leave.[33]
12 October 1, 2013 CCG-2151, CCG-1126, CCG-2113, CCG-2146 CCG law-enforcement personnel raised Chinese national flag and sworn to defend China claiming territories in territorial waters around Senkaku/Diaoyu Islands on the morning of China's National Day.[34] They also patrolled and demonstrated against JCG ships.[35] Patrolled and enforced a law on CCG ships. JCG ships requested CCG ships to leave.[36]
13 October 28, 2013 CCG-2350, CCG-1123, CCG-2102, CCG-2166 Patrolled and demonstrated against JCG ships.[37] Patrolled and enforced a law on CCG ships. JCG ships requested CCG ships to leave.[38]
14 November 7, 2013 CCG-2337, CCG-2506, CCG-2151, CCG-2112 Patrolled and demonstrated against JCG ships.[39][40] Patrolled and enforced a law on CCG ships. JCG ships requested CCG ships to leave.[41]
15 November 16, 2013 CCG-2337, CCG-2112, CCG-2151, CCG-2506 Patrolled and demonstrated against JCG ships.[42] Patrolled and enforced a law on CCG ships. JCG ships warned CCG ships to leave.[43]
16 November 22, 2013 CCG-2151, CCG-2101, CCG-2113, CCG-2146 Patrolled and demonstrated against JCG ships.[44] Exercised fishery administration by law-enforcement personnel inspecting Chinese 5 fishing boats in waters around Senkaku/Diaoyu Islands.[45] Patrolled and enforced a law on CCG ships. The chair of the Asian and Oceanian Affairs Bureau of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan Junichi Ihara called Han Zhiqiang, the Chinese envoy to Japan, and raised a "solemn" protest "against China's intrusion".[46]

Japanese Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga said "absolutely cannot accept CCG conducting law-enforcement operations in Japanese exclusive economical zones". He claimed that Japan had protested through diplomatic channels.[47]

17 December 8, 2013 CCG-2350, CCG-2506, CCG-2166 Patrolled and demonstrated against JCG ships.[48] Patrolled and enforced a law on CCG ships. JCG ships warned CCG ships to leave.[49]
18 December 22, 2013 CCG-2337, CCG-2102, CCG-2112, CCG-2151 Patrolled and demonstrated against JCG ships.[50] Patrolled and enforced a law on CCG ships. JCG ships warned CCG ships to leave.[51]
19 December 29, 2013 CCG-2337, CCG-2112, CCG-2151 Patrolled and demonstrated against JCG ships.[52] Patrolled and enforced a law on CCG ships. JCG ships warned CCG ships to leave.[53]
20 January 12, 2014 CCG-2506, CCG-2113, CCG-2166 Patrolled and demonstrated against JCG ships.[54] Patrolled and enforced a law on CCG ships. Japanese minister of defense Itsunori Onodera says "Japan should react to China's law-enforcement vessels intruding Japanese territorial waters" when he reviewed the military drill of Japanese First Parachute Regiment held at Funabashi. The drill is about landing on and "recapturing an outlying island from enemy's occupation".[55][56]
21 January 27, 2014 CCG-2337, CCG-2112, CCG-2151 Patrolled and demonstrated against JCG ships.[57] Patrolled and enforced a law on CCG ships. JCG ships requested CCG ships to leave. The chair of the Asian and Oceanian Affairs Bureau of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan Junichi Ihara protested to Han Zhiqiang, the Chinese envoy to Japan.[58]
22 February 2, 2014 CCG-2350, CCG-2166, CCG-2506 Patrolled and demonstrated against JCG ships.[59] Patrolled and enforced a law on CCG ships. JCG ships requested CCG ships to leave.[60]
23 February 17, 2014 CCG-2151, CCG-2113, CCG-2102 Patrolled and demonstrated against JCG ships.[61] Patrolled and enforced a law on CCG ships. JCG ships requested CCG ships to leave.[62]
24 February 23, 2014 CCG-2151, CCG-2113, CCG-2102 Patrolled and demonstrated against JCG ships.[63] Patrolled and enforced a law on CCG ships. JCG ships requested CCG ships to leave.[64]

See also

References

  1. ^ - Articles - Nation merging maritime patrol forces
  2. ^ Logon Form
  3. ^ RealClearPolitics - Articles - U.S. Coast Guard Has Chinese aboard
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External links

  • CCG - Chinese Defence Today
  • (Chinese) China Maritime Safety Administration official website
  • (Chinese) State Oceanic Administration
  • (Chinese) Aid to navigation
  • (Chinese) China Hidrography
  • (Chinese) China Rescue & Salvage
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