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Christian Samuel Weiss

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Christian Samuel Weiss

Christian Samuel Weiss

Christian Samuel Weiss (February 26, 1780 – October 1, 1856) was a German mineralogist born in Leipzig.

Following graduation, he worked as a physics instructor in Leipzig from 1803 until 1808. and in the meantime, conducted geological studies of mountain formations in Tyrol, Switzerland and France (1806–08).[1] In 1810 he became a professor of mineralogy at the University of Berlin, where in 1818/19 and 1832/33, he served as university rector.[1] He died near Eger in Bohemia.

Weiss is credited for creating parameters of modern crystallography, and was instrumental in making it a branch of mathematical science. He stressed the significance of direction in crystals, considering crystallographic axes to be a possible basis for classification of crystals. He is credited for introducing the categorization schema of crystal systems, and has a basic law of crystallography named after him called the "Weiss zone law".

Works by Weiss that have been translated into English

  • "On the methodical and natural distribution of the different systems of crystallisation" Edinburgh : Printed for A. Constable, 1823.
  • "On the crystallographic discoveries and systems of Mohs and Weiss" (with Friedrich Mohs); Edinburgh : Printed for A. Constable, 1823.[2]

References

  • Parts of this article are based on a translation of an equivalent article at the German WorldHeritage.
  • Historical atlas of crystallography by José Lima-de-Faria, Martin Julian Buerger
  1. ^ a b Christian Samuel Weiss — Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin biographical information
  2. ^ WorldCat Identities Most widely held works by Christian Samuel Weiss

External links

  • University of Cambridge DoITPoMS Teaching and Learning Packages (Weiss zone law explained)
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