Cyrtian

Faravahar background
History of Greater Iran
Until the rise of modern nation-states
Pre-modern

The Cyrtians or Kyrtians (gr. Κύρτιοι Kýrtioi, lat. Cyrtii) was an ancient Median[1] tribe in historic Persia.

According to Rüdiger Schmitt,[2] a tribe dwelling mainly in the mountains of Atropatenian Media together with the Cadusii, Amardi (or “Mardi”), Tapyri, and others (Strabo 11.13.3). Strabo characterized the Cyrtians living in Persia as migrants and predatory brigands.

In the Hellenistic period they seem to have been in demand as slingers, for they fought as such for the Median satrap Molon in his revolt against King Antiochus III in 220 BC.[2]

In popular culture

In the computer game Rome: Total Realism there are several Cyrtian unit types: Cyrtian slingers, Cyrtian swordsmen etc.

References

  1. ^ G. Asatrian, Prolegomena to the Study of the Kurds, Iran and the Caucasus, Vol.13, pp. 1–58, 2009: "Evidently, the most reasonable explanation of this ethnonym must be sought for in its possible connections with the Cyrtii (Cyrtaei) of the Classical authors."
  2. ^ a b Schmitt, Rüdiger. "CYRTIANS". Center for Iranian Studies, Encyclopædia Iranica. New York: Columbia University. Retrieved 2009-05-09. 


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