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Diocese of Como

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Diocese of Como

Diocese of Como
Dioecesis Comensis
Como
Location
Country Italy
Ecclesiastical province Milan
Statistics
Area 4,244 km2 (1,639 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics
(as of 2006)
533,000
523,000 (98.1%)
Parishes 338
Information
Denomination Catholic Church
Rite Roman Rite
Established 4th Century
Cathedral Basilica Cattedrale di S. Maria Assunta
Current leadership
Pope
Bishop Diego Coletti
Map
Diocesi di Como.png
Website
www.diocesidicomo.it

The Catholic Diocese of Como (Latin: Dioecesis Comensis) in northern Italy, has existed since the fourth century. It is a suffragan of the archdiocese of Milan. The bishops' seat is in Como Cathedral.

Local legend credits the conversion of Como to the apostolate of Hermagoras of Aquileia (died c. 70). Until 1528 Como was, indeed, a suffragan of the patriarchate of Aquileia (later of Venice) and followed the Aquileian Rite. In 1528 Como was placed under the jurisdiction of the Archbishop of Milan.

History

The first known bishop was Saint Felix, ordained by Saint Ambrose

  • St Felix (386–391)
  • St Provino (391–420)
  • St Amanzio (420–450)
  • St Abbondio (450–489), sent as legate to the Council of Chalcedon by Leo the Great
  • St Console (489–495)
  • St Esuperanzio (495–512)
  • St Eusebius (512–525)
  • St Eutichio (525–539)
  • St Eupilio (approx. 539)
  • St Flaviano I
  • St Prospero
  • St John I Orco (approx. 607)
  • St Agrippino (607–617)
  • St Rubiano
  • St Adalbert
  • St Martiniano
  • St Vittorino (approx. 628), opponent of Arianism as propagated by the Lombards
  • St John II
  • St John III
  • St Ottaviano
  • St Benedict I
  • St Flaviano II (approx. 712)
  • Adeodato (712–730)
  • Gausoaldo (approx. 730)
  • Angilbert I (approx. 750)
  • Lupo (approx. 750)
  • Teodolfo
  • Adelongo (approx. 776)
  • Peter I (776–818)
  • Leo I (823–838)
  • Perideo (840–843)
  • Amalrico (844–865)
  • Angilbert II (866–880)
  • Liutardo (888–905)
  • Valperto I (911–914)
  • Valperto II (915)
  • Peter II (921)
  • Azzone (922–945)
  • Waldo (946–966)
  • Adelgisio (973–977)
  • Peter III (983–1005)
  • Eberhardus (1004–1006)
  • Albericus (1007–1027), founder of the Abbey of Sant'Abbondio
  • Liudger (1030/32–1046)
  • Benno (1049–1061)
  • Rainaldo (1061/62–1084), expelled by Emperor Henry IV for his loyalty to Pope Gregory VII
  • Eribert (1085–1088)
  • Hartwicus (1092), probably antibishop
  • Guido Grimoldi (1098–1125)
  • Landulfus de Carcano (1098–1118), antibishop
  • Ardizzone I (1125–1159)
  • Enrico della Torre (1162–1167)
  • Anselmo della Torre (1168–1193)
  • Ardizzone II (1195–1197)
  • Guglielmo della Torre (1197–1226), builder of many churches and founder of a hospital
  • Uberto di Sala (1228–1256)
  • Leone degli Avvocati (1259–1261)
  • Raimondo della Torre (1262–1274)
  • Giovanni degli Avvocati (1274–1293)
  • Leone Lambertenghi (1294–1325)
  • Benedetto di Asinago or Asinaga (1328–1339), who fled from the persecution of the Rusca, Lords of Como
  • Beltramino Paravicini (1339–1340)
  • Bonifacio da Modena (1340–1352)
  • Bernard (1352–1356)
  • Andrea degli Avvocati (1356–1361)
  • Stefano Gatti (1362–1369)
  • Enrico da Sessa (1369–1380)
  • Beltramo da Brossano (1380–1395)
  • Lucchino da Brossano or Borsano (1396–1408), who began to build the new cathedral
  • Antonio Turcone (1409–1420)
  • Francesco Bossi (1420–1434)
  • Giovanni Barbavara (1436–1437)
  • Gerardo Landriani (1437–1445)
  • Bernardo Landriani (1446–1451)
  • Antonio Pusterla (1451–1457)
  • Martino Pusterla (1457–1460)
  • Lazzaro Scarampi (1460–1466)
  • Branda Castiglioni (1466–1487)
  • Antonio Trivulzio (1487–1508)
  • Scaramuccia Trivulzio (1508–1527)
  • Cesare Trivulzio (1527–1548)
  • Bernardino della Croce (1548–1559)
  • Gianantonio Volpi (1559–1588), the learned reformer
  • Feliciano Ninguarda (1588–1595)
  • Filippo Archinti (1595–1621)
  • Aurelio Archinti (1621–1622)
  • Desiderio Scaglia (1622–1625)
  • Lazzaro Carafino (1626–1665)
  • Ambrogio Torriano (1666–1679)
  • Carlo Ciceri (1680–1694)
  • Stefano Menati (1694–1695)
  • Francesco Bonesana (1696–1709)
  • Giuseppe Olgiati (1710–1735)
  • Alberico Simonetta (1736–1739)
  • Paolo Cernuschi (1739–1746)
  • Agostino M. Neuroni (1746–1760)
  • Giovanni Battista Anastasius count Peregrini (1760–1764)
  • Giambattista Mugiasca (1765–1789)
  • Giuseppe Bertieri (1790–1792)
  • Carlo Rovelli (1793–1819)
  • Giambattista Castelnuovo (1821–1831)
  • Carlo Romanò (1831–1855)
  • Giuseppe Marzorati (1858–1865)
  • Pietro Carsana (1872–1887)
  • Luigi Nicora (1887–1890)
  • Andrea Carlo Ferrari (1891–1894), also archbishop of Milan
  • Teodoro Valfrè di Bonzo (1895–1905), also archbishop of Vercelli
  • Alfonso Archi (1905–1925)
  • Adolfo Luigi Pagani (1926–1930)
  • Alessandro Macchi (1930–1947)
  • Felice Bonomini (1947–1974)
  • Teresio Ferraroni (1974–1989)
  • Alessandro Maggiolini (1989–2006)
  • Diego Coletti (2006–today)

In the tenth century the Bishops of Como were also its temporal lords. Como Cathedral was begun in 1396, and was completed only in 1595; later the cupola and some small chapels were added (1730–44).

Parishes

The 338 parishes of the diocese are spread across four provinces of the Lombardy region: the Province of Como, the Province of Lecco, the Province of Sondrio, and the Province of Varese.[1]

Notes

External links

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