World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Disciplinary repository

 

Disciplinary repository

A disciplinary repository (or subject repository) is an online archive containing works or data associated with these works of scholars in a particular subject area.[1][2] In contrast to institutional repositories, disciplinary repositories can accept work from scholars from any institution. A disciplinary repository shares the roles of collection, dissemination and archive of work with other repositories, but is focused on a particular area. These collections can include academic and research papers.

Disciplinary repositories can acquire their content in many ways. Many rely on author or organization submissions, such as SSRN. Others such as CiteSeerX crawl the web for scholar and researcher websites and download publicly available academic papers from those sites. AgEcon, established in 1995,[3] grew as a result of active involvement of academia and societies.

A disciplinary repository generally covers one broad based discipline, with contributors from many different institutions supported by a variety of funders; the repositories themselves are likely to be funded from one or more sources within the subject community.[4] Deposit of material in a disciplinary repository is sometimes mandated by research funders.

Disciplinary repositories can also act as stores of data related to a particular subject, allowing documents along with data associated with that work to be stored in the repository.

What was believed to be the first public Workshop on Disciplinary Repositories[5] was held on June 16 and 17, 2011, at the ACM Joint Conference on Digital Libraries in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

Examples

References

  1. ^ "The Internet and Unrefereed Scholarly Publishing". 2003. Retrieved 2010-12-01. 
  2. ^ "Institutional Repositories: Essential Infrastructure for Scholarship in the Digital Age". 2003. Retrieved 2010-12-14. 
  3. ^ "AgEcon Search: An International Disciplinary Repository". 2009. Retrieved 2010-12-01. 
  4. ^ "Development of Disciplinary Repositories: A Case Study of Open DOAR". 2010. Retrieved 2010-11-20. 
  5. ^ "Digital Repositories and Field-Specific Digital Libraries: Opportunities and Challenges". 2011. Retrieved 2011-06-22. 

External links

  • Disciplinary repositories at the Open Access Directory
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.