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District municipality

A district municipality is a designation for a class of municipalities found in several locations, including Canada, Lithuania, and South Africa.

Contents

  • Usage in British Columbia 1
  • Usage in Ontario 2
  • Usage in South Africa 3
  • References 4

Usage in British Columbia

Under provincial law, municipalities are to be designated "district municipalities" on incorporation if the area to be incorporated is greater than 800 hectares (8 km²) and has an average population density of less than 5 persons per hectare (500 persons per km²).[1] Municipalities may be incorporated under different classifications under the direction of the Lieutenant Governor in Council, as is the case with the District of North Vancouver.

Usage in Ontario

Currently, only one District Municipality exists, Muskoka District Municipality, Ontario. It was formerly a District, but has undergone heavy urbanization and development, particularly from tourism, as it is the heart of Ontario's cottage country. As a result, it was "upgraded" from a District (such as neighbouring Parry Sound District) to having powers similar to a Regional Municipality, such as York Regional Municipality.

Usage in South Africa

In South Africa, district municipalities are administrative divisions of a province. South Africa recognizes three types of municipality; metropolitan, district and local. District municipalities are made up of a number of local municipalities. The vast majority of land consists of district municipalities, with metropolitan municipalities being reserved for large cities and the areas around them. There are eight metropolitan municipalities, and 44 district municipalities subdivided into 226 local municipalities.

References

  1. ^ "Local Government Act (RSBC 1996) CHAPTER 323". Queen's Printer (British Columbia). Retrieved 2007-07-26. 
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