World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article
 

Ensign Racing

Ensign Long_name = Ensign Racing Team
Base Burntwood, United Kingdom
Founder(s) Mo Nunn
Noted drivers Clay Regazzoni
Chris Amon
Marc Surer
Jacky Ickx
Nelson Piquet
Jan Lammers
Rikky von Opel
Formula One World Championship career
First entry 1973 French Grand Prix
Races entered 99
Constructors'
Championships
0 (best finish: 10th, 1977)
Drivers'
Championships
0
Race victories 0 (best finish: 4th, 1981 Brazilian Grand Prix)
Pole positions 0 (best grid position: 3rd, 1976 Swedish Grand Prix)
Fastest laps 1
Final entry 1982 Caesars Palace Grand Prix

Ensign was a Formula One constructor from Britain. They participated in 133 grands prix, entering a total of 155 cars. Ensign scored 19 championship points and no podium finishes. The best result was a 4th place at the 1981 Brazilian Grand Prix by Marc Surer, who also took fastest lap of the race.

Ensign was founded by Morris Nunn who also carried out design duties during the first two seasons of the team's existence. Nunn would later go on to be a prominent chief engineer in the American-based Champ Car series, winning championships with drivers Alex Zanardi and Juan Pablo Montoya in the late 1990s.

Contents

  • Formula One 1
  • Complete Formula One World Championship results 2
    • Results of other Ensign cars 2.1
  • References 3

Formula One

An Ensign N177 being raced in a Historic Grand Prix at the Lime Rock Park circuit in 2009.

Ensign entered Formula One in 1973, with backing from pay driver, Rikky von Opel. Von Opel had driven for the team in Formula Three in 1972 and won the Lombard North Central, British Formula Three Championship that year.[1] Based upon that success, von Opel commissioned a Formula One chassis.[1] Their first season was not successful, von Opel only finished two races[2] and the team's best result that season was 13th at the 1973 British Grand Prix.[2] However, the partnership continued into 1974, but von Opel left after the first race of the season, having been offered a works Brabham drive.[1] He was replaced at Ensign by Vern Schuppan whose only finish was 15th at the Belgian Grand Prix[3] and was later himself replaced by Mike Wilds. Wilds only qualified in America; he finished the race after a pit stop for fuel but was not classified, nine laps behind.[4]

For 1975 Ensign was sponsored by HB Bewaking (a Dutch company) leading them to sign Dutch drivers. Roelof Wunderink and Gijs van Lennep. Wunderink did not have much success qualifying for three races and finishing one. Gijs van Lennep qualified for all his races and took sixth place in Germany, securing the first points for Ensign in Formula One. Chris Amon also raced for the team in Austria and Italy finishing 12th both times. In 1976 Amon stayed with Ensign having great qualifying results. He qualified third in Sweden and sixth in Britain but only took points in Spain where he finished in fifth place. Patrick Nève replaced Amon in France and Hans Binder replaced Amon in Austria. Jacky Ickx would race the rest of the season for Ensign.

In 1977 Clay Regazzoni raced for Ensign, scoring five points with best finishes of fifth in Italy and America. In 1978 the team entered cars for Danny Ongais and Lamberto Leoni, but Ongais left after two races and Leoni after four races. Jacky Ickx contested the next four races and Derek Daly raced the rest of the season scoring a point in Canada. Also in 1978 Nelson Piquet made his debut in Formula 1 at the German Grand Prix at the Hockenheimring driving an Ensign. In 1979 Daly stayed with Ensign but he left after the Monaco Grand Prix and was replaced by Patrick Gaillard. Gaillard only qualified at two out of five races and was replaced by Marc Surer for the final three races of the season.

The N180 at the Pavilion Kuala Lumpur

In 1980 Clay Regazzoni again joined Ensign but at Long Beach Regazzoni's brake pedal broke causing him to go straight on at the Queen's Hairpin crashing into the parked car of Ricardo Zunino leaving him paralyzed. Tiff Needell raced in Belgium, but failed to qualify for the Monaco Grand Prix. Jan Lammers raced the rest of the season.

Marc Surer raced for Ensign in 1981 and finished in fourth place in Brazil where he also took fastest lap of the race. Surer also finished sixth in Monaco. Eliseo Salazar replaced Surer from Spain onwards. Salazar finished sixth in the Netherlands. In 1982 Roberto Guerrero raced for Ensign. He only finished in two races. After the 1982 season, Ensign was merged into the Theodore team, which it had previous ties to via financier Teddy Yip and took that team's name. During many seasons, the connection between Ensign and Theodore was so great that in some years they used almost the same car, much as Red Bull Racing has a second but separate team, Toro Rosso, in more recent times.

Ensign driver Roberto Guerrero continued on with the newly merged team for 1983, as did the team's main car designer.[5] The Theodore F1 team did not last the 1983 season, though, and shut down late in the year.[5]

Complete Formula One World Championship results

() (results in italics indicate fastest lap)

Year Chassis Engine(s) Tyres Drivers 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 Points WCC
1973 Ensign N173 Ford V8 F ARG BRA RSA ESP BEL MON SWE FRA GBR NED GER AUT ITA CAN USA 0 NC
Rikky von Opel 15 13 DNS Ret Ret NC Ret
1974 Ensign N174 Ford V8 F ARG BRA RSA ESP BEL MON SWE NED FRA GBR GER AUT ITA CAN USA 0 NC
Rikky von Opel DNS
Vern Schuppan 15 Ret DSQ DSQ DNQ DNQ Ret
Mike Wilds DNQ DNQ DNQ NC
1975 Ensign N174
Ensign N175
Ford V8 G ARG BRA RSA ESP MON BEL SWE NED FRA GBR GER AUT ITA USA 1 12th
Roelof Wunderink Ret DNQ DNQ NC DNQ Ret
Gijs van Lennep 10 15 6
Chris Amon 12 12
1976 Ensign N174
Ensign N176
Ford V8 G BRA RSA USW ESP BEL MON SWE FRA GBR GER AUT NED ITA CAN USA JPN 2 12th
Chris Amon 14 8 5 Ret 13 Ret Ret Ret
Patrick Nève 18
Hans Binder Ret
Jacky Ickx Ret 10 13 Ret
1977 Ensign N177 Ford V8 G ARG BRA RSA USW ESP MON BEL SWE FRA GBR GER AUT NED ITA USA CAN JPN 10* 10th*
Clay Regazzoni 6 Ret 9 Ret Ret Ret 7 7 DNQ Ret Ret Ret 5 5 Ret Ret
Jacky Ickx 10
1978 Ensign N177 Ford V8 G ARG BRA RSA USW MON BEL ESP SWE FRA GBR GER AUT NED ITA USA CAN 1 13th
Danny Ongais Ret Ret
Lamberto Leoni Ret DNS DNQ DNQ
Jacky Ickx Ret 12 Ret DNQ
Derek Daly DNQ Ret DSQ Ret 10 8 6
Nelson Piquet Ret
Brett Lunger 13
1979 Ensign N177
Ensign N179
Ford V8 G ARG BRA RSA USW ESP BEL MON FRA GBR GER AUT NED ITA CAN USA 0 NC
Derek Daly 11 13 DNQ Ret DNQ DNQ DNQ
Patrick Gaillard DNQ 13 DNQ Ret DNQ
Marc Surer DNQ DNQ Ret
1980 Ensign N180 Ford V8 G ARG BRA RSA USW BEL MON FRA GBR GER AUT NED ITA CAN USA 0 NC
Clay Regazzoni NC Ret 9 Ret
Tiff Needell Ret DNQ
Jan Lammers DNQ DNQ 14 DNQ DNQ DNQ 12 Ret
Geoff Lees Ret DNQ
1981 Ensign N180B Ford V8 M
A
USW BRA ARG SMR BEL MON ESP FRA GBR GER AUT NED ITA CAN CPL 5 11th
Marc Surer Ret 4 Ret 9 11 6
Eliseo Salazar 14 Ret DNQ NC Ret 6 Ret Ret NC
1982 Ensign N180B
Ensign N181
Ford V8 P RSA BRA USW SMR BEL MON DET CAN NED GBR FRA GER AUT SUI ITA CPL 0 NC
Roberto Guerrero DNQ DNQ Ret DNQ DNQ Ret Ret DNQ Ret DNQ 8 Ret Ret NC DNS

* Includes five points scored by Patrick Tambay in an Ensign N177 entered by Theodore Racing (see below).

Results of other Ensign cars

() (Results in bold indicate pole position)

Year Entrant Chassis Engine Tyres Driver 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
1976 HB Bewaking Alarm Systems Boro Ensign N175 Ford Cosworth DFV G BRA RSA USW ESP BEL MON SWE FRA GBR GER AUT NED ITA CAN USA JPN
Larry Perkins 13 8 DNQ Ret Ret Ret
1977 Theodore Racing Hong Kong Ensign N177 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G ARG BRA RSA USW ESP MON BEL SWE FRA GBR GER AUT NED ITA USA CAN JPN
Patrick Tambay Ret 6 Ret 5 Ret DNQ 5 Ret
1978 Mario Deliotti Racing Ensign N175 Ford Cosworth DFV 3.0 V8 G ARG BRA RSA USW MON BEL ESP SWE FRA GBR GER AUT NED ITA USA CAN
Geoff Lees DNQ
Sachs Racing Ensign N177 Harald Ertl 11 Ret DNPQ DNPQ

References

  1. ^ a b c Small, Steve (1994). The Guinness Complete Grand Prix Who's Who. Guinness. p. 273.  
  2. ^ a b Small, Steve (1994). The Guinness Complete Grand Prix Who's Who. Guinness. p. 272.  
  3. ^ Small, Steve (1994). The Guinness Complete Grand Prix Who's Who. Guinness. p. 344.  
  4. ^ Small, Steve (1994). The Guinness Complete Grand Prix Who's Who. Guinness. p. 401.  
  5. ^ a b Roberto Guerrero – Biography
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.