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Expedition of Amr ibn al-As

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Title: Expedition of Amr ibn al-As  
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Subject: Battle of Tabouk, Siege of Ta'if, Caravan raids, Conquest of Fadak, Expedition of Abdullah ibn Rawaha
Collection: 629 in Asia, Campaigns Ordered by Muhammad
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Expedition of Amr ibn al-As

Expedition of Amr ibn al-As
Date September 629 AD, 8AH, 6th month[1][2]
Location Dhatas Salasil
Result
  • Successful operation, enemy flees (1 tribe stayed to fight[3])
[4]
Commanders and leaders
Amr ibn al-As Unknown
Strength
300 initially,[5] then 200 reinforcements[6] Unknown (very large)
Casualties and losses
unknown unknown

Expedition of Amr ibn al-As,[7] also known as the Campaign of Dhatas Salasil,[8] took place in September 629 AD, 8AH, 6th month, of the Islamic Calendar.[9][10]

Contents

  • Background 1
  • Expedition 2
  • Islamic Primary sources 3
  • See also 4
  • Notes 5

Background

The repulse of the Muslim army at the Battle of Mu’tah, affected dangerously Muhammad's prestige among the tribes of the Syrian frontier. There were rumours that a number of tribes, including Banu Qudah were now preparing to attack Medina.

He appointed Amr ibn al-As, the new convert of Islam, to subjugate the Banu Qudah tribe, and incite the tribes friendly to Muhammad to attack the Banu Qudah. Amr was chosen because he was related to the Banu Bali tribe, who were located in the area he was to carry out the operation.[11][12]

Muhammad sent 300 men and 30 horses with Amr ibn al-As as commander,[13][14] and in the event of great opposition, the tribes who had already submitted to Islam to come to his aid.[15]

Expedition

After Marching for 10 days, he encamped a spring called Salasil, there he found that the enemy was assembled in large numbers, so he sent a messenger back to Muhammad asking for reinforcement. Muhammad straight away complied and sent 200 men, among whom were Abu Bakr and Umar, headed by Abu Ubaidah ibn al Jarrah.[16]

When Abu Ubaidah arrived he asked to be the Commander of the entire force, to which Amr refused, Abu Ubaidah accepted this and said "be it so", claiming he was told by Muhammad not to fight or cause divisions over leadership.[17]

With this increased number of Muslim army, Amr ibn al-As charged at his enemy and "destroyed them" according to the Muslim scholar Saifur Rahman al-Mubarakpuri, while causing most to flee,[18][19] except one tribe which fought.[20]

Islamic Primary sources

The Expedition is referenced in the Sunni hadith collection Sahih al-Bukhari as follows:

See also

Notes

  1. ^ List of Battles of Muhammad
  2. ^ "Atlas Al-sīrah Al-Nabawīyah". Retrieved 17 December 2014. 
  3. ^ List of Battles of Muhammad
  4. ^ "The Life of Mahomet and History of Islam to the Era of the Hegira". Retrieved 17 December 2014. 
  5. ^ "Atlas Al-sīrah Al-Nabawīyah". Retrieved 17 December 2014. 
  6. ^ "The Sealed Nectar". Retrieved 17 December 2014. 
  7. ^ "Atlas Al-sīrah Al-Nabawīyah". Retrieved 17 December 2014. 
  8. ^ Dhat As-Salasil Campaign, Witness-Pioneer.com
  9. ^ List of Battles of Muhammad
  10. ^ "The Life of Mahomet and History of Islam to the Era of the Hegira". Retrieved 17 December 2014. 
  11. ^ "The Life of Mahomet and History of Islam to the Era of the Hegira". Retrieved 17 December 2014. 
  12. ^ "The Sealed Nectar". Retrieved 17 December 2014. 
  13. ^ "The Sealed Nectar". Retrieved 17 December 2014. 
  14. ^ Dhat As-Salasil Campaign, Witness-Pioneer.com
  15. ^ "The Life of Mahomet and History of Islam to the Era of the Hegira". Retrieved 17 December 2014. 
  16. ^ "The Life of Mahomet and History of Islam to the Era of the Hegira". Retrieved 17 December 2014. 
  17. ^ "The Life of Mahomet and History of Islam to the Era of the Hegira". Retrieved 17 December 2014. 
  18. ^ "The Sealed Nectar". Retrieved 17 December 2014. 
  19. ^ Dhat As-Salasil Campaign, Witness-Pioneer.com
  20. ^ List of Battles of Muhammad
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