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Expedition of Ghalib ibn Abdullah al-Laithi (Al-Kadid)

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Title: Expedition of Ghalib ibn Abdullah al-Laithi (Al-Kadid)  
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Subject: Conquest of Fadak, Demolition of Dhul Khalasa, Expedition of Ali ibn Abi Talib (Hamdan), Expedition of Ali ibn Abi Talib (Mudhij), Expedition of Alqammah bin Mujazziz
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Expedition of Ghalib ibn Abdullah al-Laithi (Al-Kadid)

Expedition of Ghalib ibn Abdullah al-Laithi (Al-Kadid)
Date May 629 AD, 8AH, 1st month[1] May 628 AD, 7AH, 3rd Month[2]
Location Al Kadid
Result * Successful operation, lots of booty captured[3][4]
Commanders and leaders
Ghalib ibn Abdullah al-Laithi Unknown
Strength
10-15[5] Entire tribe (unknown population)
Casualties and losses
0 Many killed[6][3]

(2 captured)[4][3]

(1 captured according Abu Dawud)[7]

Expedition of Ghalib ibn Abdullah al-Laithi to Al-Kadid took place in May 629 AD, 8AH, 1st month, of the Islamic Calendar,[8] Or according to other sources May 628 AD, 7AH, 3rd Month.[2]

Expedition

A platoon headed by Ghalib bin ‘Abdullah Al-Laithi in Safar or in Rabi‘ Al-Awwal 7 A.H, Muhammad sent Ghalib ibn Abdallah al-Laythi, with between 10-15 men to raid the Banu al-Mulawwih at al-Kadid.[9]

According to the Abu Dawud Hadith collection, when the Muslims arrived at al-Kadid they met a man, al-Harith ibn Malik and took him as a prisoner. He informed Ghalib that he had come to embrace Islam. But he chained him up for safety reasons.[10]

The tribe was attacked and taken by surprise.[3] The Muslims managed to kill a large number of the enemy soldiers and captured a great deal of booty. A large army of polytheists then pursued the Muslims, but heavy floods hindered the pursuit, and the Muslims managed to escape in safety.[4]

According to Ibn Sa'd and Tabari, based on an account through Ibn Ishaq, who was told by a man from the Aslam tribe, the password used by Muslims to recognize one another while fighting at night was:

Amit Amit (kill kill, in arabic[11])
[Ibn Sa'd, Kitab al-tabaqat al-kabir, Volume 2, Pg 156][12][13]

The Muslim Scholar Saifur Rahman al Mubarakpuri suggest that the reason for the attack was that the Banu Mulawwih were being provocative (without further details),[4] whereas the Non Muslim historian Sir William Muir claims the reason for the attack is unknown.[3]

Islamic primary sources

The event in also mentioned in the Sunni Hadith collection Abu Dawud as follows:

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Abu Khalil, Shawqi (1 March 2004). Atlas of the Prophet's biography: places, nations, landmarks. Dar-us-Salam. p. 212.   Note: 8AH, 1st month=May 629
  2. ^ a b Hawarey, Dr. Mosab (2010). The Journey of Prophecy; Days of Peace and War (Arabic). Islamic Book Trust. Note: Book contains a list of battles of Muhammad in Arabic, English translation available here
  3. ^ a b c d e William Muir, The life of Mahomet and history of Islam to the era of the Hegira, Volume 4, p. 94.
  4. ^ a b c d Mubarakpuri, The Sealed Nectar, p. 241. (online), "A platoon headed by Ghalib bin ‘Abdullah Al-Laithi in Safar"
  5. ^ "The first saryah of the year led by Ghalib b. Abdullah to al-Kadid", King Abdul Aziz University Author references, Ibn Sa'd Volume 2, Pg 124-125
  6. ^ Abu Khalil, Shawqi (1 March 2004). Atlas of the Prophet's biography: places, nations, landmarks. Dar-us-Salam. p. 212.   Note: 8AH, 1st month=May 629
  7. ^ Sunan Abu Dawood, 14:2672 (alternative source archived)
  8. ^ Abu Khalil, Shawqi (1 March 2004). Atlas of the Prophet's biography: places, nations, landmarks. Dar-us-Salam. p. 212.   Note: 8AH, 1st month=May 629
  9. ^ "The first saryah of the year led by Ghalib b. Abdullah to al-Kadid", King Abdul Aziz University Author references, Ibn Sa'd Volume 2, Pg 124-125
  10. ^ Sunan Abu Dawood, 14:2672
  11. ^  
  12. ^ Sa'd, Ibn (1967). Kitab al-tabaqat al-kabir,By Ibn Sa'd,Volume 2. Pakistan Historical Society. p. 156.  
  13. ^ Tabari, vol.viii, p.142
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