World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Expedition of Khalid ibn al-Walid (Najran)

Article Id: WHEBN0032122805
Reproduction Date:

Title: Expedition of Khalid ibn al-Walid (Najran)  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Battle of Mu'tah, Occupation of Mecca, Battle of Zumail, Battle of Saniyy, Battle of Muzayyah
Collection: 631 in Asia, Campaigns Ordered by Muhammad
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Expedition of Khalid ibn al-Walid (Najran)

Expedition of Khalid ibn al-Walid,[1] to Najran, took place in 10AH of the Islamic Calendar,[2] Around June 631 AD.[3]

The event is mentioned partly in the Quran verse 3:61.[4][5] The event is also mentioned by the Muslim jurist Tabari, who mentions that Muhammad wrote a letter to Khalid ibn al-Walid. Those letters are also mentioned by Muhammad Hamidullah in his French book Six Originaux des letters diplomatiques du Prophete e l'Islam, which contains a collection of six of the Muhammad's letters whose original texts have been preserved, that he compiled.[6] Muhammad Hamidullah considered the letters authentic.[7] The translator of Tabari, Volume 9, The last Years of the Prophet, Isma'il Qurban Husayn, mentions in the footnote on page 83, that the letter mentioned by Tabari is also in the texts collected by Muhammad Hamidullah.[8]

Contents

  • Background 1
  • Expedition 2
  • Islamic primary sources 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5
  • Notes 6

Background

Najran consisted of Christian tribes, and polytheist tribes. A year before this Expedition, the Christian portion of the Banu Harith sent a delegation led by a Bishop.[3] The Christian delegation started to debate with Muhammad, claiming that Jesus was the son of God. According to Ibn Kathir, the Quran verse 3:61 was "revealed" about this event:[4][5]

But whoever disputes with you in this matter after what has come to you of knowledge, then say: Come let us call our sons and your sons and our women and your women and our near people and your near people, then let us be earnest in prayer, and pray for the curse of God on the liars. [Quran 3:61]
The delegation refused to convert to Islam, it is reported that one of Muhammad's companion said to the Christians:
If you have already decided that you will remain in your religion and your creed regarding your fellow (`Isa), then conduct a treaty with the man (Muhammad) and go back to your land.' [Quote referenced in Tafsir ibn Kathir][4][5]

According to Ar-Rahīq al-Makhtum (The Sealed Nectar), a modern Islamic hagiography of Muhammad written by the Indian Muslim author Saif ur-Rahman Mubarakpuri, having refused to convert to Islam, Muhammad ordered the tribe to pay the Jizyah and give Muhammad 2,000 garments, in exchange for peace and security.[9] A part of the tribe were still practising Idolatry, and Muhammad only had a treaty with the Christian part of the tribe, so he sent Khalid ibn Walid with a group of armed men to call on the rest of the tribe to embrace Islam. William Muir also claims that Muhammad told Khalid to attack them if they refused to convert.[3]

Expedition

When Khalid arrived at the destination he sent armed men on horses on all directions to proclaim to the people:

Ye people! Embrace Islam, and ye Shall be safe. [Tabari Volume 9]

The remaining inhabitants agreed to convert, and Muhammad sent a despatch (official report), making it known that he was happy with the result.[3]

It is mentioned by Tabari that Khalid ibn al-Walid, stayed with them to teach them Islam, then returned with a deputation of the tribe to Muhammad. Muhammad criticised the tribe for previously defending themselves against him when his followers attacked them, he said "You are the ones when driven away would push forward.", and then said that if they did not surrender when Khalid was sent to them, he would have cut their heads off, he said:[10]

"Had Khalid b. al-Walid not written to me that you had surrendered and had not fought, I would have thrown your heads underneath your feet."[Tabari Volume 9][10]

Muhammad then engaged in an argument with them about how they defeated previous tribes which attacked them.[10]

Islamic primary sources

The event is partly mentioned in the Quran verse 3:61[4]

The event is also mentioned by the Muslim Jurist Tabari, as follows:

Tabari said Abdullah ibn Abi Bakr was the narrator of the event.[11] The information of the letters mentioned by Tabari in the above has also been collected by Muhammad Hamidullah (and he considers his letters authentic [7]). Muhammad Hamidullah collected 6 of Muhammad's letters whose original texts have been preserved, he compiled it in his French book Six Originaux des letters diplomatiques du Prophete e l'Islam.[6] The translator of Tabari, The last Years of the Prophet, Isma'il Qurban Husayn, mentions in the footnote on page 83, that the letter mentioned by Tabari is also in the texts collected by Muhammad Hamidullah.[8]

See also

References

  1. ^ Abu Khalil, Shawqi (1 March 2004). Atlas of the Prophet's biography: places, nations, landmarks. Dar-us-Salam. p. 239.  
  2. ^ Abū Khalīl, Shawqī (2003). Atlas of the Quran. Dar-us-Salam. p. 244.  
  3. ^ a b c d Muir, William (August 1878), The life of Mahomet (Full free digitized version), Kessinger Publishing Co, p. 224 
  4. ^ a b c d Saed Abdul Rahman, Muhammad (11 Nov 2009), Tafsir Ibn Kathir Juz' 3 (Part 3): Al-Baqarah 253 to Al-I-'Imran 92 2nd Edition, MSA Publication Ltd, p. 125,  
  5. ^ a b c Tafsir ibn Kathir, Online Text Version, on 3:61
  6. ^ a b "Dr Muhammad Hamidullah (1909-2002)". Renaissance.com.pk. Retrieved 2011-06-01. An archive of the page is available here
  7. ^ a b Hamidullah, The life and work of the Prophet of Islam, Volume , p. 279
  8. ^ a b Tabari, The last years of the Prophet, pp. 83 & 84. See footnotes
  9. ^ Rahman al-Mubarakpuri, Saifur (2005), The Sealed Nectar, Darussalam Publications, p. 291 
  10. ^ a b c d Tabari, The last years of the Prophet, pp. 82-84.
  11. ^ Tabari, The last years of the Prophet, p. 82.

Notes

  • Tabari, Al (25 Sep 1990), The last years of the Prophet, State University of New York Press,  
  • Hamidullah, Muhammad. The life and work of the Prophet of Islam, Volume 1. s.n. p. 279.   Original from: University of Michigan. Note: Author wrote:
    “Maybe more will be known one day on the story of this precious document, and who has preserved it throughout centuries. In the present state of our knowledge, the trace of the tearing, the trace of the seald, the very old aspect of the greatest part of the writing greatest part of the writing and the conformity of the text with what the classical authors have cited incline us to believe it, at least for the time being, as authentic
    about the letters he collected, throughout his book, he has sections called “The Original of the Letter” or similar.
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.