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Foreign relations of Papua New Guinea

 

Foreign relations of Papua New Guinea

This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
Papua New Guinea

Papua New Guinea's foreign policy reflects close ties with Australia and other traditional allies and cooperative relations with neighboring countries. Its views on international political and economic issues are generally moderate. Papua New Guinea has diplomatic relations with 56 countries.

Papua New Guinea belongs to a variety of regional organizations, including the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) forum; the ASEAN Regional Forum (ARF) (Papua New Guinea is an observer member of the ASEAN); the South Pacific Commission; the Pacific Islands Forum; the Melanesian Spearhead Group and the South Pacific Regional Environmental Program (SPREP).

Contents

  • Relations by country 1
    •  Australia 1.1
    •  China 1.2
    •  Cuba 1.3
    •  Fiji 1.4
    •  France 1.5
    •  India 1.6
    •  Indonesia 1.7
    •  New Zealand 1.8
    •  Philippines 1.9
    •  South Korea 1.10
    •  United Kingdom 1.11
    •  United States 1.12
  • Papua New Guinea and the Commonwealth of Nations 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4

Relations by country

 Australia

Relations with Australia were strained in 2006 when Prime Minister Michael Somare was accused of having facilitated Julian Moti's escape to the Solomon Islands.[1] Moti was wanted in Australia for serious alleged child sex offences. In retaliation, the Australian government banned Somare from entering Australia; all talks between Canberra and Port Moresby were suspended. In September 2007, relations began to thaw,[2] and in December 2007, the new Australian Prime Minister, Kevin Rudd, met Sir Michael in Bali. Rudd announced what appears to be a normalisation of relations: "This relationship has been through a very difficult period in recent times. There has in effect been a freeze on ministerial contact between the two governments. I do not believe that's an appropriate way for the future."[3]

  • Australia has a high commission in Port Moresby.[4]
  • Papua New Guinea has a high commission in Canberra.[5]

 China

The Independent State of Papua New Guinea and the People's Republic of China (PRC) established official diplomatic relations in 1976, soon after Papua New Guinea became independent. The two countries currently maintain diplomatic, economic and, to a lesser degree, military relations. Relations are cordial; China is a significant provider of both investments and development aid to Papua New Guinea.

 Cuba

In the late 2000s, Papua New Guinea began to strengthen its relations with Cuba. Cuba provides medical aid to the country.[6] In September 2008, a PNG government representative attended the first Cuba-Pacific Islands ministerial meeting in Havana, aimed at "strengthening cooperation" between Cuba and Pacific Island countries, notably in coping with the effects of climate change.[7]

 Fiji

Date started: 1976

As of November 2005, relations with Pacific neighbor Fiji have been strained by revelations that a number of Fijian mercenaries have been operating illegally on the island of Bougainville, arming and training a rebel militia.

 France

Official diplomatic relations were established in 1976. Papua New Guinea is a member of the United Nations' Special Committee on Decolonization. The French government has noted what it calls Port Moresby's "moderate" attitude on the issue of the decolonisation of New Caledonia - which, like Papua New Guinea, is located in Melanesia.[8] The French National Assembly maintains a Friendship Group with Papua New Guinea.

 India

  • India has a High Commission in Port Moresby.[9]
  • Papua New Guinea maintains a High Commission in New Delhi.[10]

 Indonesia

Western New Guinea (which consists of two Indonesian provinces: Papua and West Papua) and Papua New Guinea share a 760-kilometre (470 mi) border that has raised tensions and ongoing diplomatic issues over many decades.[11] Indonesia is represented in Papua New Guinea with an embassy in Port Moresby and a consulate in Vanimo.

 New Zealand

  • New Zealand has a high commission in Port Moresby.[12]
  • Papua New Guinea has a high commission in Wellington.[13]

 Philippines

On March 2009, The Philippines and Papua New Guinea entered into a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) that would enhance the cooperation between the two countries on the development of fisheries. The MoU will facilitate technology transfer in aquaculture development, promotion of shipping ventures, investments, technical training, joint research, and "strategic complementation" of each country’s plans in the "Coral Triangle" – or the waters between the Philippines, Indonesia, and the Pacific Islands.[14] In the same year, Papua New Guinea asked the Philippines for help it its pursuit of membership to ASEAN.[15][16]

 South Korea

Diplomatic relations between the Republic of Korea and Papua New Guinea were established in May 1976.[17]

 United Kingdom

Papua New Guinea and the United Kingdom share Queen Elizabeth II as their head of state. They have had relations since 1975 when Papua New Guinea gained independence from Australia.

  • Papua New Guinea has a high commission in London.[18]
  • United Kingdom has a high commission in Port Moresby.[19]

 United States

The U.S. and Papua New Guinea are signatories to the U.S.-Pacific Islands Multilateral Tuna Fisheries Treaty, under which the U.S. grants $63 million per year to Pacific Island parties and the latter provide access for U.S. fishing vessels. The U.S. also supports Papua New Guinea's efforts to protect biodiversity; the International Coral Reef Initiative is aimed at protecting reefs in tropical nations such as Papua New Guinea.

  • Papua New Guinea has an embassy in Washington, DC.[20]
  • United States has an embassy in Port Moresby.[21]

Papua New Guinea and the Commonwealth of Nations

Papua New Guinea has been a member state of the Commonwealth of Nations since 1975, when it gained independence from Australia.

See also

References

  1. ^ "PNG report says PM Somare should be charged over Moti escape".  
  2. ^ "A bit of warmth returns". The Sydney Morning Herald. 10 September 2007. 
  3. ^ Nicholson, Brendan; Forbes, Mark (14 December 2007). "Solomons sacking ends chill". The Age (Melbourne). 
  4. ^ High Commission of Australia in Port Moresby
  5. ^ High Commission of Papua New Guinea in Canberra
  6. ^ "Cuban Physicians to Aid 81 Nations". Cuba:  
  7. ^ "Cuba-Pacific ministerial meeting underway in Havana", ABC Radio Australia, 17 September 2008
  8. ^ "UN calls on France to give Caledonians chance of having independence.".  
  9. ^ Indian High Commission in Papua New Guinea
  10. ^ Papua New Guinea High Commission in India
  11. ^ http://countrystudies.us/indonesia/100.htm
  12. ^ High Commission of New Zealand in Port Moresby
  13. ^ High Commission of Papua New Guinea in Wellington
  14. ^ "RP, Papua New Guinea sign MoU on fisheries". MANILA, Philippines ? The Philippines and Papua New Guinea entered into a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) that would enhance the cooperation between the two countries on the development of fisheries, Malacañang said. ...The MoU will facilitate technology transfer in aquaculture development, promotion of shipping ventures, investments, technical training, joint research, and ?strategic complementation? of each country?s plans in the ?Coral Triangle? ? or the waters between the Philippines, Indonesia, and the Pacific Islands, according to a statement released by Malacañang. 
  15. ^ Papua New Guinea asks RP support for Asean membership bid Retrieved 8 July 2009
  16. ^ Somare seeks PGMA's support for PNG's ASEAN membership bid Retrieved 8 July 2009
  17. ^ [2]
  18. ^ High Commission of Papua New Guinea in London
  19. ^ High Commission of the United Kingdom in Port Moresby
  20. ^ Embassy of Papua New Guinea in Washington, DC
  21. ^ Embassy of the United States in Port Moresby
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