French Province

The Kingdom of France was organized into provinces until March 4, 1790, when the establishment of the département system superseded provinces. The provinces of France were roughly equivalent to the historic counties of England. They came into their final form over the course of many hundreds of years, as many dozens of semi-independent fiefs and former independent countries came to be incorporated into the French royal domain. Because of the haphazard manner in which the provinces evolved, each had its own sets of feudal traditions, laws, taxation systems, courts, etc., and the system represented an impediment to effective administration of the entire country from Paris. During the early years of the French Revolution, in an attempt to centralize the administration of the whole country, and to remove the influence of the French nobility over the country, the entirety of the Province system was abolished and replaced by the system of départements, which is still in use today.

In some cases, several modern regions or départements share names with the historic provinces, and their borders may cover roughly the same territory.

List of former provinces of France

The list below shows the major provinces of France at the time of their dissolution during the French Revolution. Capital cities are shown in parentheses. Bold cities indicate that the city was the seat of a parlement or conseils souverains (sovereign councils), which were legislative and judicial bodies. In some cases, the legislature met in a different city than the traditional capital. Some of the provinces that were later incorporated into France during the revolution were not formally part of the Kingdom of France.


  1. Île-de-France (Paris)
  2. Berry (Bourges)
  3. Orléanais (Orléans)
  4. Normandy (Rouen)
  5. Languedoc (Toulouse)
  6. Lyonnais (Lyon)
  7. Dauphiné (Grenoble)
  8. Champagne (Troyes)
  9. Aunis (La Rochelle)
  10. Saintonge (Saintes)
  11. Poitou (Poitiers)
  12. Guyenne and Gascony (Bordeaux)
  13. Burgundy (Dijon)
  14. Picardy (Amiens)
  15. Anjou (Angers)
  16. Provence (Aix-en-Provence)
  17. Angoumois (Angoulême)
  18. Bourbonnais (Moulins)
  19. Marche (Guéret)
  20. Brittany (Rennes)
  21. Maine (Le Mans)
  22. Touraine (Tours)
  23. Limousin (Limoges)
  24. Foix (Foix)
  25. Auvergne (Clermont-Ferrand)
  26. Béarn (Pau)
  27. Alsace (Strasbourg, cons. souv. in Colmar)
  28. Artois (Arras)
  29. Roussillon (Perpignan)
  30. Flanders and Hainaut (Lille parlement in Douai)
  31. Franche-Comté (Besançon)
  32. Lorraine (Nancy)
  33. Corsica (off map, Ajaccio, cons. souv. in Bastia)
  34. Nivernais (Nevers)
  35. Comtat Venaissin, a Papal fief (Avignon)
  36. Imperial Free City of Mulhouse
  37. Savoy, a Sardinian fief
  38. Nice (Nice), a Sardinian fief
  39. Montbéliard (Montbéliard), a fief of Württemberg
  40. Trois-Évêchés (not pictured) (Metz, Toul and Verdun).

Coat of Arms of the Provinces, Régions, Départements and Cities of France.

This Gallery of French coats of arms shows the coats of arms of the Provinces, Régions, and Départements of France, and of certain French cities. They are used to visually identify historical and present-day regions, as well as cities, within France.

Provinces of France

Alençon Anjou Artois Berry Burgundy Brittany Champagne Dauphiné Foix
Gascony Lorraine Gévaudan Maine Marche Normandy Savoy Touraine Valois

Regions of France

Alsace Aquitaine
Auvergne Burgundy
Brittany Centre
Champagne-Ardenne Corsica
Franche-Comté Île-de-France
Languedoc-Roussillon Limousin
Lorraine Midi-Pyrénées
Nord-Pas-de-Calais Lower Normandy
Upper Normandy Pays de la Loire
Picardy Poitou-Charentes
Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur Rhône-Alpes

Départements of France

01 Ain 02 Aisne 03 Allier 04 Alpes-de-Haute-Provence 05 Hautes-Alpes
06 Alpes-Maritimes 07 Ardèche 08 Ardennes 09 Ariège 10 Aube
11 Aude 12 Aveyron 13 Bouches-du-Rhône 14 Calvados 15 Cantal
16 Charente 17 Charente-Maritime 18 Cher 19 Corrèze 20 Corse
21 Côte-d'Or 22 Côtes-d'Armor 23 Creuse 24 Dordogne 25 Doubs
26 Drôme 27 Eure 28 Eure-et-Loir 29 Finistère 30 Gard
31 Haute-Garonne 32 Gers 33 Gironde 34 Hérault 35 Ille-et-Vilaine
36 Indre 37 Indre-et-Loire 38 Isère 39 Jura 40 Landes
41 Loir-et-Cher 42 Loire 43 Haute-Loire 44 Loire-Atlantique 45 Loiret
46 Lot 47 Lot-et-Garonne 48 Lozère 49 Maine-et-Loire 50 Manche
51 Marne 52 Haute-Marne 53 Mayenne 54 Meurthe-et-Moselle 55 Meuse
56 Morbihan 57 Moselle 58 Nièvre 59 Nord 60 Oise
61 Orne 62 Pas-de-Calais 63 Puy-de-Dôme 64 Pyrénées-Atlantiques 65 Hautes-Pyrénées
66 Pyrénées-Orientales 67 Bas-Rhin 68 Haut-Rhin 69 Rhône 70 Haute-Saône
71 Saône-et-Loire 72 Sarthe 73 Savoie 74 Haute-Savoie 75 Paris
76 Seine-Maritime 77 Seine-et-Marne 78 Yvelines 79 Deux-Sèvres 80 Somme
81 Tarn 82 Tarn-et-Garonne 83 Var 84 Vaucluse 85 Vendée
86 Vienne 87 Haute-Vienne 88 Vosges 89 Yonne 90 Territoire de Belfort
91 Essonne 92 Hauts-de-Seine 93 Seine-Saint-Denis 94 Val-de-Marne 95 Val-d'Oise

Cities

Cannes Chaumont Clermont-Ferrand Grenoble Dijon Langres Lille
Error creating thumbnail: File seems to be missing:
Lyon Le Mans Mende Montluçon Mundolsheim Nevers Paris
Saint-Denis Sainte-Enimie Savenay Strasbourg La Tour-du-Pin Vendenheim Vézelay

See also

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.