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Garam masala

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Title: Garam masala  
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Subject: Cumin, Indian cuisine, Powder-douce, Ras el hanout, Tandoori masala
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Garam masala

A garam masala

Garam masala (from Hindi: गरम मसाला, garam ("hot") and masala (a mixture of spices)) is a blend of ground spices common in North Indian and other South Asian cuisines.[1] It is used alone or with other seasonings. The word garam refers to "heat" in the Ayurvedic sense of the word, meaning "to heat the body" as these spices, in the Ayurvedic system of medicine, elevate body temperature.

Contents

  • Ingredients 1
    • Use in specific dishes 1.1
  • See also 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

Ingredients

Typical Ingredients for a garam masala (clockwise from upper left): Black peppercorns, mace, cinnamon, cloves, brown cardamom, nutmeg, green cardamom. However, others can be used.

The composition of garam masala differs regionally, with many recipes across India according to regional and personal taste,[1] and none is considered more authentic than others. The components of the mix are toasted, then ground together.

A typical Indian version of garam masala contains:

Some recipes call for spices to be blended with herbs, while others for the spices to be ground with water, vinegar, coconut milk, or other liquids, to make a paste. In some recipes nuts, onion, or garlic may be added. Some recipes also call for small quantities of star anise, asafoetida, stone flower or Dagadphool and Kababchini (Cubeb). The flavours may be carefully blended to achieve a balanced effect, or a single flavour may be emphasized. A masala may be toasted before use to release its flavours and aromas.[1]

Use in specific dishes

The order in which spices are added to food may be very elaborate in some dishes.

  • Rogan josh: In the case of this Kashmiri speciality, for example, coriander, ginger and chilis are each ground individually, and a garam masala of cloves, cardamom, fennel, red or black chilies, cumin, turmeric and nutmeg is prepared separately. The cook tastes the dish carefully to determine the precise moment when the next spice should be added. The order is coriander first, then the ground ginger, then the garam masala, and finally the chilis.[1]
  • Murgh kari (chicken curry): In this chicken dish, the procedure is also precise. First, the chicken is fried and removed from the pan. Onion, garlic, and fresh ginger are added to the pan and cooked slowly for 7 to 8 minutes. Next cumin, turmeric, ground coriander, cayenne, and fennel seed are added with water and fried for a minute or so. Next tomato concassé is added with fresh coriander, yoghurt, and salt. The chicken is returned to the pan and more water is added. Finally, some garam masala is sprinkled on top, the pot is tightly covered, and the dish cooks another 20 minutes before serving.
  • Pilau (Pilaf): In Pakistan, garam masala is a common additive in various types of this dish. It is usually added to hot oil in which onions have been fried golden brown.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d Rama Rau, Santha (June 1969). The Cooking of India (Foods of the World). USA: Time Life Education.  

External links

  • Another garam masala recipe
  • Punjabi garam masala recipe - learn to make Punjabi garam masala at home
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