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Glaucous

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Title: Glaucous  
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Subject: Shades of blue, Eucalyptus stenostoma, Paeonia clusii, Vaccinium floribundum, Eucalyptus bridgesiana
Collection: Bird Colours, Plant Morphology, Shades of Blue, Shades of Gray
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Glaucous

Glaucous
    Color coordinates
Hex triplet #6082B6
sRGBB  (rgb) (96, 130, 182)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (47, 29, 0, 29)
HSV       (h, s, v) (216°, 47%, 71%)
Source ISCC-NBS
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Glaucous (from the Latin glaucus, meaning "bluish-grey or green", from the Greek glaukós) is used to describe the pale grey or bluish-green appearance of the surfaces of some plants, as well as in the names of birds, such as the Glaucous Gull (Larus hyperboreus), Glaucous-winged Gull (Larus glaucescens), Glaucous Macaw (Anodorhynchus glaucus), and Glaucous Tanager (Thraupis glaucocolpa).

The term glaucous is also used botanically as an adjective to mean "covered with a greyish, bluish, or whitish waxy coating or bloom that is easily rubbed off" (e.g. glaucous leaves).

The first recorded use of glaucous as a color name in English was in the year 1671.[1]

Contents

  • Examples 1
  • See also 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

Examples

The epicuticular wax coating on mature plum fruit gives them a glaucous appearance. Another familiar example is found in the common grape genus (Vitis vinifera). Some cacti have a glaucous coating on their stem(s). Glaucous coatings are hydrophobic, prevent wetting by rain, and hinder climbing of leaves, stem or fruit by insects. On fruits, glaucous coatings may function as a deterrent to climbing and feeding by small insects in favor of increased seed dispersal offered by larger animals such as mammals and birds.

The blue-grey camouflage coloring of some species of birds and sea and land animals causes their appearance to blend with their surroundings, making their detection by predators or prey difficult.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Glaucous, a.".  

External links

  • The dictionary definition of glaucous at Wiktionary



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