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Hohenlohe (district)

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Title: Hohenlohe (district)  
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Subject: Heilbronn (district), Schwäbisch Hall (district), Stuttgart (region), Main-Tauber-Kreis, Baden-Württemberg
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Hohenlohe (district)

The Hohenlohekreis is a district (Landkreis) in the north of Baden-Württemberg, Germany. Neighboring districts are (from north clockwise) Neckar-Odenwald, Main-Tauber, Schwäbisch Hall and Heilbronn.

Künzelsau is the administration centre of the district.

Industry and companies

History

The district was created in 1973 by merging the previous districts Öhringen and Künzelsau. It was named after the family of Hohenlohe, who once had ruled most of the area, until 1806 when they lost their independence as this area became part of the kingdom of Württemberg.

Geography

The two main rivers of the districts are the Kocher and Jagst, both affluents to the Neckar. The highest elevation of the district with 523 m is the Mühlberg near Waldenburg.

Partnerships

Since 1990 the district has a partnership with the County Limerick in the Republic of Ireland. In the same year it also started a friendship with the district Großenhain (now Riesa-Großenhain) in the Free State of Saxony, helping to build the administration according to West German standards.

Dialect

The dialect spoken locally is Hohenlohisch, an East Franconian dialect.

Coat of arms

Coat of arms The coat of arms in its top part shows two lions, which is the symbol of the family of Hohenlohe, who once had ruled most of the area. The Wheel of Mainz in bottom is the symbol of the clerical state of Mainz, which also had some possessions around Krautheim.

Cities and municipalities

Cities Administrative districts Municipalities
  1. Forchtenberg
  2. Ingelfingen
  3. Krautheim
  4. Künzelsau
  5. Neuenstein
  6. Niedernhall
  7. Öhringen
  8. Waldenburg
  1. Hohenloher Ebene
  2. Krautheim
  3. Künzelsau
  4. Kochertal
  5. Öhringen
  1. Bretzfeld
  2. Dörzbach
  3. Kupferzell
  4. Mulfingen
  5. Pfedelbach
  6. Schöntal
  7. Weißbach
  8. Zweiflingen

References

External links

  • Official website (German)
  • Hohenlohe images (English)(German)
  • Map of Hohenlohe areas in the 1780s

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