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Jens Jeremies

Jens Jeremies
Personal information
Date of birth (1974-03-05) 5 March 1974
Place of birth Görlitz, East Germany
Height 1.77 m (5 ft 9 12 in)
Playing position Midfielder
Youth career
1980–1986 Motor Görlitz
1986–1993 Dynamo Dresden
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1993–1995 Dynamo Dresden 10 (1)
1995–1998 1860 Munich 78 (2)
1998–2006 Bayern Munich 160 (6)
Total 248 (9)
National team
1995 Germany U21 3 (1)
1997–2004 Germany 55 (1)

* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.

† Appearances (goals)

Jens Jeremies (born 5 March 1974) is a retired German footballer who played as a defensive midfielder.

Best known for his tackling abilities, he played for three clubs during his professional career, most notably remaining nine years at the service of Bayern Munich, which he helped to 16 titles, 12 as an important unit, in a career also marred by many injuries.

Jeremies won more than 50 caps for Germany, representing the nation in two World Cups and as many European Championships, and helping it finish second in the 2002 World Cup.

Contents

  • Club career 1
    • Beginnings / TSV 1860 Munich 1.1
    • FC Bayern 1.2
  • International career 2
  • Career statistics 3
    • Club 3.1
    • International goals 3.2
  • Honours 4
    • Club 4.1
    • International 4.2
  • References 5
  • External links 6

Club career

Beginnings / TSV 1860 Munich

Born in Görlitz, East Germany, Jeremies joined the youth system of one of the most important clubs in the country, Dynamo Dresden, at the age of 12. As a professional, he appeared rarely over the course of two seasons, all the matches being played in the 1994–95 campaign, his debut coming on 1 April 1995, in a 1–3 loss at TSV 1860 München, as the team ended a four-stay in the Bundesliga.

In 1995, Jeremies signed for 1860 Munich, helping the Lions qualify for the UEFA Cup in his second year, and receiving totals of 30 yellow cards and two red during his three-year spell.

FC Bayern

Jeremies moved to TSV's city neighbours FC Bayern Munich in the summer of 1998, the club for which he would play the remainder of his career.[1] With the Bavarians, he won all of his trophies, including six leagues and three domestic cups, adding the 2000–01 UEFA Champions League, to which he contributed with 12 games and three goals, including one in the 2–1 semifinal win against Real Madrid (3–1 on aggregate) – he missed the final through suspension.

After only 20 matches combined in his last two seasons, mainly due to constant knee problems, Jeremies retired from football, at the age of 32. He appeared in 251 Bundesliga matches and scored 9 goals.[2]

International career

Whilst at TSV Munich, Jeremies gained the first of his 55 caps for the German national team[3] on 15 November 1997 in a friendly against South Africa, playing the full 90 minutes in a 3–0 win, in Düsseldorf. He was then picked for the squad at the 1998 FIFA World Cup, appearing in three games in an eventual last-eight exit; during the competition, German entertainer Harald Schmidt reverentially called him "Jens Jerenaldo".

On 31 March 1999, Jeremies scored his first and only international goal, helping to a 2–0 home win against Finland for the UEFA Euro 2000 qualifiers, which was later chosen as Goal of the Month in Germany; however, he was dropped from the national team during the buildup to the finals, after calling the Erich Ribbeck-led side "pityful".[4] He was later reinstated for the 2002 World Cup,[5] even captaining the team once in a friendly after the competition,[6] but retired from international football after Germany's group stage exit in Euro 2004 in Portugal, claiming he wanted to focus on his club duties with Bayern.

Career statistics

Club

As of 16 February 2013

Club performance League Cup League Cup Continental Other Total
Club League Season Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Germany League DFB-Pokal DFB-Ligapokal Europe Other Total
Dynamo Dresden Bundesliga 1994–95 10 1 0 0 10 1
Total 10 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 1
1860 München 1995–96 29 0 3 0 32 0
1996–97 27 2 1 0 28 2
1997–98 22 0 1 1 3 0 26 1
Total 78 2 5 1 0 0 3 0 0 0 86 3
Bayern Munich 1998–99 30 1 6 1 2 0 11 0 49 2
1999–2000 30 3 4 1 0 0 10 0 44 4
2000–01 21 1 1 0 1 0 12 3 35 4
2001–02 10 0 4 1 0 0 6 1 0 0 20 2
2002–03 29 0 4 0 0 0 7 1 40 1
2003–04 23 1 2 0 1 0 4 0 30 1
2004–05 7 0 2 0 2 0 1 0 12 0
2005–06 13 0 4 0 0 0 1 0 18 0
Total 163 6 27 6 6 0 52 5 0 0 248 17
Career total 251 9 32 7 6 0 55 5 0 0 344 21

International goals

Scores and results list Germany's goal tally first.
# Date Venue Opponent Score Result Competition
1. 31 March 1999 easyCredit-Stadion, Nuremberg  Finland 1–0 2–0 Euro 2000 qualifier

Honours

Club

International

References

  1. ^ Neuhaus, Les (6 May 2006). "Former Germany player Jens Jeremies set to play last match".  
  2. ^ Arnhold, Matthias (23 September 2015). "Jens Jeremies - Matches and Goals in Bundesliga". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 1 October 2015. 
  3. ^ Arnhold, Matthias (23 September 2015). "Jens Jeremies - International Appearances". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 1 October 2015. 
  4. ^ "Hughes loses taste for scrambled Egil". London:  
  5. ^ Jens Jeremies – FIFA competition record
  6. ^ "Jens Jeremies to captain Germany against Bulgaria".  

External links

  • Jens Jeremies at fussballdaten.de (German)
  • Jens Jeremies at weltfussball.de (German)
  • Jens Jeremies at National-Football-Teams.com
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