Khwajagan

Khwājagān (shortened forms: Khwaja, Khaja(h), Khawaja or khuwaja) is a Persian title for "the Master". Khwajagan is a word often used to refer to a chain of Central Asian Naqshbandi Sufi Masters from the 10th to the 16th century. In Firdowsi's Shahnama the word is used many times for some rulers and heroes of ancient Iran.

Interest in the Khwajagan was revived in the 20th century with the publication in Turkey of "Hacegan Hanedani", by Hasan Lutfi Shushud, Istanbul, 1958. His sources included:

  • Resahat'i Ayn'el Hayat, compiled by Mevlana Ali Bin Huseyin Safi, A.H. 993.
  • Nefahat'el Uns min Hazerat'el Kuds, A.H. 1289, by Abdurrahman Cami A.H. 881.
  • Risale'i Bahaiyye, by Rif'at Bey.
  • Semerat'el Fuad, by Sari Abdullah.
  • Enisu't Talibin wa Iddetu's Salikin Makamat'i Muhammed Bahaeddin Nakshibend, by Salahaddin Ibn'i Mubarek'el Buhari, Istanbul A.H. 1328.

A short translation of Shushud's work by J. G. Bennett was published in “Systematics” Volume 6, No. 4 March 1969, Muhter Holland's full length translation "Masters of Wisdom of Central Asia" was published by Coombe Springs press in 1983. J. G. Bennett also wrote a full length work loosely based on Shushud's original.

Some authors such as Idries Shah and John Godolphin Bennett maintain that George Ivanovich Gurdjieff's 'Fourth Way' originated with the Khwajagan.

Prominent Central Asian Khwajagan included:

See also

Bibliography

External links

  • Gurdjieff and Sufism
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