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Kusari-fundo

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Title: Kusari-fundo  
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Subject: Edo period police, Samurai, Kubi bukuro, Hata-jirushi, Kyoketsu-shoge
Collection: Chain Weapons of Japan, Ninjutsu Artefacts, Samurai Chain Weapons
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Kusari-fundo

Antique Japanese kusari fundo/manriki.

Kusari-fundo, (鎖分銅), is a hand held weapon used in feudal Japan consisting of a length of chain (kusari) with a weight (fundo) connected to each end of the chain. Various sizes and shapes of chain and weight were used as there was no set rule on the construction of these weapons. Other popular names are manrikigusari (萬力鏈) meaning ten thousand power chain[1]or just manriki.[2]

Contents

  • Parts of the kusari-fundo 1
    • The chain (kusari) 1.1
    • The weight (fundo) 1.2
  • Use 2
  • History 3
  • Gallery 4
  • See also 5
  • References 6
  • External links 7

Parts of the kusari-fundo

The chain (kusari)

The kusari of a kusari fundo.

Typically the length of the forged chain could vary from around 12 inches up to 48 inches. The chain could have many different shapes including round, elliptical, and egg shaped. The thickness of the chain also varied. Usually the first link of chain attached to the weight was round and often larger and thicker than the rest of the links of the chain.[3]

The weight (fundo)

The fundo of a kusari fundo.

The weight attached to each end of the chain could have many different sizes and shapes, the weights were usually exactly matched in size and shape but on some of the related chain and weight weapons the weights could be completely different from each other, with one weight being much longer than the other like a handle on one end or one weight could be round while the other weight could be rectangular. Weight shapes include round, hexagon, rectangle. The weight could be fairly light or quite heavy with the typical weight being from 56.25 grams to 112.5 grams.[4]

Use

The use of the kusari-fundo was taught in several different schools, or ryū (流), as a hidden or concealed weapon and also as a self-defense weapon. The kusari-fundo was useful when carrying a sword was not allowed or impractical, and samurai police of the Edo period would often use a kusari-fundo as one of their non lethal arresting weapons.[5][6]

History

There are several chain and weight weapons with one type known as a konpi being mentioned in manuscripts as far back as the Nanbokucho period (1336-1392).

The founder of the Masaki ryū Masaki Tarodayu Dannoshin Toshiyoshi (1689-1776) is said to have developed a version of the kusari-fundo[7] while serving Lord Toda as a bloodless weapon that could be used to defend the grounds of Edo castle.[8]

Gallery

See also

References

  1. ^ , Oscar Ratti, Adele Westbrook, Tuttle Publishing, 1991 p.317Secrets of the samurai: a survey of the martial arts of feudal Japan
  2. ^ , Serge Mol, Kodansha International, 2003 pages 125-136Classical weaponry of Japan: special weapons and tactics of the martial arts
  3. ^ , Serge Mol, Kodansha International, 2003 pages 125-136Classical weaponry of Japan: special weapons and tactics of the martial arts
  4. ^ , Serge Mol, Kodansha International, 2003 pages 125-136Classical weaponry of Japan: special weapons and tactics of the martial arts
  5. ^ , Louis Frédéric, Harvard University Press, 2005 p.160 p.607Japan encyclopedia
  6. ^ Classical weaponry of Japan: special weapons and tactics of the martial arts, Serge Mol, Kodansha International, 2003 pages 125-136
  7. ^ , Oscar Ratti, Adele Westbrook, Tuttle Publishing, 1991 p.317Secrets of the samurai: a survey of the martial arts of feudal Japan
  8. ^ , Serge Mol, Kodansha International, 2003 pages 125-136Classical weaponry of Japan: special weapons and tactics of the martial arts

External links

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