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Landed property

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Title: Landed property  
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Subject: Private property, Gentry, Latifundium, Nepal citizenship law, Landed
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Landed property

In real estate, a landed property or landed estate is a property that generates income for the owner without the owner having to do the actual work of the estate. In medieval Western Europe, there were two competing systems of landed property, on one hand manoralism, inherited from the Roman villa system, where a large estate is owned by the Lord of the Manor and leased to tenants, and on the other hand the family farm or Hof owned by and heritable within a commoner family (c.f. yeoman), inherited from Germanic law.

Modern landed property often consists of housing or industrial land, generating income in the form of rents or fees for services provided by the facilities on the land, such as port facilities. Owners often commission an estate map to help manage their estate as well as serving as a status symbol.[1]

Landed property was a key element of feudalism, and freed the owner for other tasks, such as government administration, military service, the practice of Law, or religious practices.

In later times, the dominant role of landed estates as a basis of public service faded. Development of landed aristocracy.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ A Sarah Bendall, Maps, Land and Society: A History, with a Carto-bibliography, of Cambridgeshire Estate Maps, 1600-1836 (Cambridge University Press, 1992)
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