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List of fighting games

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Title: List of fighting games  
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Subject: Fighting game, Bounces, Dual Heroes, Cover system, Grand Theft Auto clone
Collection: Fighting Games, Video Game Lists by Genre
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List of fighting games

Part of a series on
Action games

Fighting games are categorized by close combat between two fighters or groups of fighters of comparable strength, often broken into rounds. If multiple players are involved, players generally fight against each other.

Note: Games are in listed in a "common English title/alternate title - developer" format, where applicable.

Contents

  • General 1
    • 2D 1.1
    • 2.5D 1.2
    • 3D 1.3
  • Weapon-based 2
    • 2D 2.1
    • 2.5D 2.2
    • 3D 2.3
  • Tag team-based 3
    • 2D 3.1
    • 2.5D 3.2
    • 3D 3.3
  • Arena Fighting games 4
    • 2D 4.1
    • 2.5D 4.2
    • 3D 4.3
  • 4-way simultaneous fighting 5
    • 2D 5.1
    • 2.5D 5.2
    • 3D 5.3
  • Anime/Cell-Shaded Fighting games 6
    • 2D 6.1
    • 2.5D 6.2
    • 3D 6.3
  • Sports/fighting game subgenres 7
    • Boxing 7.1
    • Boxing management 7.2
    • Mixed martial arts 7.3
    • Kickboxing 7.4
    • Wrestling 7.5
  • By theme 8
    • Crossover 8.1
    • Eroge 8.2
    • Mech 8.3
    • Monster 8.4
    • RPG 8.5
    • Super deformed 8.6
  • See also 9
  • External links 10

General

2D

Fighting games that use 2D sprites. Games tend to emphasize height based (high, medium, low) attacks and jumping.

2.5D

2.5D versus fighting games are displayed in full 3D graphics, but the gameplay is based on 2D style games, or via traditional style

3D

Utilize three dimensional movement. These often emphasize sidestepping.

Weapon-based

Adding melee weapons to a versus fighting game often makes attack range more of a factor.

2D

2.5D

3D

Tag team-based

Fighting games that feature 'tag-teaming' as the core gameplay element. Other fighters feature tag-teaming as a separate mode.

2D

2.5D

3D

Arena Fighting games

Also known as Platform Fighters or Party Brawlers. While traditional 2D/3D fighting games mechanics are more or less descendant of Street Fighter II games in this subgenre tend to blend fighting with elements taken from platform games. Typical match usually takes battle royal formula. Comparing to traditional fighting games fighting engines are simplified and emphasis is put on dynamic maneuvering over arena where fight takes place. Proper utilization of advantages and disadvantages of arena which can be combined with usage of (often randomly spawning) items is also major gameplay element. Arena Fighting games by their nature are more casual friendly as opposed to generally more competitive oriented traditional fighting games.

2D

2.5D

3D

4-way simultaneous fighting

Fighters in which four fighters face off at once simultaneously. However, some fighting games feature 4-way fighting as game modes.

2D

2.5D

3D

Anime/Cell-Shaded Fighting games

These fighting games that feature Cell-Shading mostly falls into the anime category. Even though anime falls into this category of cell shaded fighting games, there are some anime games that are 2D and use sprites(Examples are Dragonball Z for the Super Famicom). With this said, most anime games are played mostly the same. Normally having one button for each action (Ex. 1 button for attacking, using projectiles, using specials, jumping, blocking, etc.). This is most likely due to the games being more player friendly for the kids who like the shows. Even though Super Smash Bros. series has the same game play scheme, it is exempt from this Cell- Shaded feature.

2D

2.5D

3D

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