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Lucia Migliaccio of Floridia

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Title: Lucia Migliaccio of Floridia  
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Subject: List of monarchs of Sicily, Charles III of Spain, Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies, House of Bourbon-Two Sicilies, Burial sites of European monarchs and consorts, Descendants of Charles III of Spain
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Lucia Migliaccio of Floridia

Lucia Migliaccio
Duchess of Floridia

Spouse Benedict Grifeo, Prince of Partanna
Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies
House House of Bourbon-Two Sicilies
Father Vincent Migliaccio
Mother Dorotea Borgia
Born (1770-07-19)19 July 1770
Syracuse, Kingdom of Sicily
Died 26 April 1826(1826-04-26) (agedĀ 55)
Naples, Kingdom of the Two Sicilies
Religion Roman Catholic

Lucia Migliaccio, Duchess of Floridia (19 July 1770, Syracuse, Sicily - 26 April 1826, Naples) was the second wife of Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies. Their marriage was morganatic and Lucia was never a Queen consort.

Family

She was a daughter of Vincent Migliaccio and Dorotea Borgia. Her mother came from Spain.

Marriages

She married first Benedict Grifeo, Prince of Partanna

On 27 November 1814, Lucia married Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies, also known as Ferdinand III of Sicily, in Palermo. The bride was forty-four years old and the groom sixty-three. Their marriage created a scandal as it took place within three months after his first wife Queen Maria Carolina of Austria had died (on 8 September 1814). This was contrary to the court's protocol rules which imposed a one year period of mourning. By then, Ferdinand had already practically abdicated his power by naming their eldest son Prince Francis as his regent and delegating most decisions to him. While Marie Caroline was considered the de facto ruler of Sicily until 1812, Lucia had very limited influence and little interest in politics.

Ferdinand was restored to the throne of the Kingdom of Naples by right of his victory on the Battle of Tolentino (3 May 1815) over rival monarch Joachim I. On 8 December 1816 he merged the thrones of Sicily and Naples under the name of the throne of the Two Sicilies. With Francis still serving as his Regent and Lucia as the Royal consort.

Ferdinand continued to rule until his death on 4 January 1825. Lucia survived him by a year and three months. There were no children from this marriage.

External links

  • Her profile in Peerage.com
  • A Genealogy of the Royal Family of the Two Sicilies

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