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Momo the Monster

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Momo the Monster

Momo
(Missouri Monster)
Grouping Cryptid
First reported 1971
Country United States
Region Louisiana, Missouri

Momo is the name of a local legend, similar to the Bigfoot, which is reported to live in Missouri. The name Momo is short for 'Missouri Monster' and it is reported to have a large, pumpkin-shaped head, with a furry body, and hair covering the eyes. First reported in July 1971, near Louisiana, Missouri by Joan Mills and Mary Ryan, Momo has been spotted up and down the Mississippi River. It is supposedly a large, 7 ft (2.1 m) tall, hairy, black, manlike creature that emits a terrible odor. Some suggest it was a rogue black bear. Following sightings in 1972 beginning at 3:30 p.m. July 11, first reported by Terry, Wally, and Doris Harrison, and lasting for about 2 weeks, tracks were found and submitted to Lawrence Curtis, director of the Oklahoma City Zoo and Botanical Garden. He deemed the tracks to be a hoax.[1]

Reported sightings

  • 1971 - A pack of picnickers reported that Momo came out of the surrounding woods. While they locked themselves in their car, the creature supposedly ate their food.
  • 1972 - Local children reported seeing Momo walk past them with a dead dog. Soon after, a farmer reported a flash of light, growls, and the strong odor that is associated with Momo.[2]

References

General
Specific
  1. ^ Newton, Michael (2005). "Momo". Encyclopedia of Cryptozoology: A Global Guide. McFarland & Company, Inc. p. 304.  
  2. ^ Moran, Mark & Scheurman, Mark (2004). Weird U.S. Barnes & Noble Books. p. 124.  

External links

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