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Mouse

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Title: Mouse  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Subject: List of fictional rodents, Eureeka's Castle, Bear in the Big Blue House, Second Battle of Beruna, Rodent
Collection: Invasive Mammal Species, Mice, Miocene First Appearances
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Mouse

Mouse
Temporal range: Late Miocene–Recent
House mouse (Mus musculus).
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Rodentia
Superfamily: Muroidea
Family: Muridae
Subfamily: Murinae
Genus: Mus
Linnaeus, 1758
Species

30 known species

A mouse (plural: mice) is a small mammal belonging to the order of rodents, characteristically having a pointed snout, small rounded ears, a body-length scaly tail and a high breeding rate. The best known mouse species is the common house mouse (Mus musculus). It is also a popular pet. In some places, certain kinds of field mice are also common. They are known to invade homes for food and occasionally shelter.

The American white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus) and the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), as well as other common species of mouse-like rodents around the world, also sometimes live in houses. These, however, are in other genera.

Cats, wild dogs, foxes, birds of prey, snakes and even certain kinds of arthropods have been known to prey heavily upon mice. Nevertheless, because of its remarkable adaptability to almost any environment, the mouse is one of the most successful mammalian genera living on Earth today.

Mice can at times be vermin, damaging and eating crops,[1] causing structural damage and spreading diseases through their parasites and feces.[2] In North America, breathing dust that has come in contact with mouse excrement has been linked to hantavirus, which may lead to Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS).

Primarily nocturnal[3][4] animals, mice compensate for their poor eyesight with a keen sense of hearing, and rely especially on their sense of smell to locate food and avoid predators.[5]

Mice build intricate burrows in the wild. These burrows typically have long entrances and are equipped with escape tunnels/routes. In at least one species, the architectural design of a burrow is a genetic trait.[6]

Reproduction

1 day old pups

Breeding onset is at about 50 days of age in both females and males, although females may have their first estrus at 25–40 days. Mice are polyestrous and breed year round; ovulation is spontaneous. The duration of the estrous cycle is 4–5 days and estrus itself lasts about 12 hours, occurring in the evening. Vaginal smears are useful in timed matings to determine the stage of the estrous cycle. Mating is usually nocturnal and may be confirmed by the presence of a copulatory plug in the vagina up to 24 hours post-copulation. The presence of sperm on a vaginal smear is also a reliable indicator of mating.[7]

Female mice housed together tend to go into anestrus and do not cycle. If exposed to a male mouse or the pheromones of a male mouse, most of the females will go into estrus in about 72 hours. This synchronization of the estrous cycle is known as the Whitten effect. The exposure of a recently bred mouse to the pheromones of a strange male mouse may prevent implantation (or pseudopregnancy), a phenomenon known as the Bruce effect.[7]

The average gestation period is 20 days. A feon systematics and nomenclature>> by. S.K. Korb. Caucasian Entomological Bulletin, 3 (1): 75-80. Abstract: [1].

  • Bolshakov, L.V. & S.K. Korb, 2013: A new species of Euphydryas aurinia (Rottemburg, 1775) - group from Caucasus (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae). Eversmannia, 34: 25-31.Lavr Valeryevich Bolshakov (L.V. Bolshakov)

Entomologist, Russia

Publications

  • Bolshakov, L.V., 2002: New species of pyraloid moths from the Centre of European Russia (Lepidoptera: Pyraustidae). Russian Entomological Journal 11 (2): 225-228. Full article: [2]
  • Bolshakov, L.V., 2005: About two South-Russian taxa from Polyommatus icarus (Rottemburg, 1775) group (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae). Eversmannia, 2: 6-8. Full article: [3]. (in Russian).
  • Bolshakov, L.V., 2007: Notes on some controversial taxa of Lepidoptera from European Russia, with critical remarks about <
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