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Music of Kuwait

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Title: Music of Kuwait  
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Subject: Music of Asia, Middle Eastern music, Music of Qatar, Music of Syria, Music of Oman
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Music of Kuwait

Tabla player Ustad Munawar Khan at the 8th International Music Festival in Kuwait

The music of Kuwait was well-recorded until the Gulf War, when Iraq invaded the country and destroyed the archive. Nevertheless, Kuwait has retained a vital music industry, both long before the war and after.[1] Kuwaiti music reflects the diverse influences of many peoples on the culture of Kuwait, including Swahili and Indian music.

Kuwait has a reputation for being the central musical influence of the Gulf Cooperation Council countries. Kuwaiti music is very popular in all GCC countries and even Iraq. Kuwait is known as the center for sawt, a bluesy style of music made popular in the 1970s by Shadi al Khaleej (the Bird Song of the Gulf). Nawal El Kuwaiti, Nabeel Shoail and Abdallah Al Rowaished are the most popular modern sawt performers, who include influences from techno and Europop in their music; Kuwaiti sawt musicians are well-known across the Gulf region.[1] Other popular groups include the long-running Al-Budoor Band and Guitara Band.

Contents

  • Traditional 1
  • Pop 2
  • Local musicians and recent developments 3
  • References 4

Traditional

Traditional Kuwaiti music reflects the diverse influences of many peoples on the culture of Kuwait, including Swahili and Indian music. In pre-oil times, Kuwait's seafaring community was known for its music. 20-30% of seafaring Kuwaitis were professional musicians in pre-oil times, a figure unheard of anywhere else. Music is deeply tied to Kuwait's maritime heritage and has always been a significant part of the country's cultural life.

Kuwait's seafaring tradition is known for songs such as Fidjeri. Fidjeri is a musical repertoire performed traditionally by male pearl divers. It involves singing, clapping, drums and dances with earthen water jars. Liwa and Fann at-Tanbura are types of music performed mainly by Kuwaitis of East African origin. "Al Arda Al Bahariya" is a well-known Kuwaiti sailor song, as are the al-Nahma, a class of songs that accompanied many sailing activities. Kuwait is known as the center for sawt, a bluesy style of music made popular in the 1970s.

Pop

Kuwait has a reputation for being the central musical influence of the Gulf Cooperation Council countries. Over the last decade of satellite TV stations, there has been a stream of Kuwaiti pop bands that have been successful in reaching other Arab countries with their unique style of pop. Bashar Al Shatty is the most famous young Kuwaiti artist after his appearing in star academy the first season an he gained the second runner.

Local musicians and recent developments

Kuwait has a reputation for being a core influence for music in the GCC stands. In December 2010, Kuwait Music was founded to help musicians by "providing collaboration and promotion tools to network with and share their music".[2]

References

  1. ^ a b Badley, Bill. "Sounds of the Arabian Peninsula". 2000. In Broughton, Simon and Ellingham, Mark with McConnachie, James and Duane, Orla (Ed.), World Music, Vol. 1: Africa, Europe and the Middle East, pp 351-354. Rough Guides Ltd, Penguin Books. ISBN 1-85828-636-0
  2. ^ "Kuwait Music". Kuwait Music. Retrieved 2013-03-17. 
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