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Nanostructure

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Title: Nanostructure  
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Nanostructure

The DNA structure at left (schematic shown) will self-assemble into the structure visualized by atomic force microscopy at right. Image from Strong.[1]

A nanostructure is a structure of intermediate size between microscopic and molecular structures. Nanostructural detail is microstructure at nanoscale.

In describing nanostructures it is necessary to differentiate between the number of dimensions on the nanoscale. Nanotextured surfaces have one dimension on the nanoscale, i.e., only the thickness of the surface of an object is between 0.1 and 100 nm. Nanotubes have two dimensions on the nanoscale, i.e., the diameter of the tube is between 0.1 and 100 nm; its length could be much greater. Finally, spherical nanoparticles have three dimensions on the nanoscale, i.e., the particle is between 0.1 and 100 nm in each spatial dimension. The terms nanoparticles and ultrafine particles (UFP) often are used synonymously although UFP can reach into the micrometre range. The term 'nanostructure' is often used when referring to magnetic technology.

Nanoscale structure in biology is often called ultrastructure.

Contents

  • List of nanostructures 1
  • References 2
  • See also 3
  • External links 4

List of nanostructures

References

  1. ^ M. Strong (2004). "Protein Nanomachines".  

See also

External links

  • Nano Flakes May Revolutionize Solar Cells.
  • Applications of Nanoparticles
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