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New Great Migration

Graph showing the percentage of the African American population living in the American South, 1790-2010.

The New Great Migration is the demographic change from 1965 to the present, which is a reversal of the previous 35-year trend of black migration within the United States. Since 1965, deindustrialization of cities in the Northeastern and Midwestern United States, growth of jobs in the "New South" with lower costs of living, family and kinship ties, and improving racial relations have all acted to attract African Americans to the Southern United States in substantial numbers. As early as 1975-1980, seven southern states were net black migration gainers. African-American populations continue to drop throughout much of the Northeast, particularly with black emigration out of the state of New York,[1] as well as out of Northern New Jersey,[2] as they rise in the Southern United States.

Maryland, the majority of the population growth being in the counties surrounding Washington D.C. In that same period, California was a net loser of black migration for the first time in three decades. While the migration is still in progress, much data is from this 35-year period.[3]

The New Great Migration is not evenly distributed throughout the South; primary destinations are those states that have the most job opportunities, especially North Carolina, Maryland, Virginia, Tennessee, Florida, and Texas. Other southern states including Mississippi, Louisiana, South Carolina, Alabama, and Arkansas have seen little net growth in the African American population from this 'return migration."

See also

References

  1. ^
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  3. ^ William H. Frey, "The New Great Migration: Black Americans' Return to the South, 1965-to the present", The Brookings Institution, accessed 19 Mar 2008
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