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Noadswood School

 

Noadswood School

Noadswood School
Motto Fit for learning, fit for life
Type Academy
Headteacher Mr A Bernard BA, MA (Ed)
Chair of Governors Mrs J Rapson
Location North Road
Dibden Purlieu
Hampshire
SO45 4ZF
England
Local authority Hampshire
DfE URN 116415 Tables
Ofsted Reports
Staff 150
Students 1,100
Gender Coeducational
Ages 11–16
Houses      Deerleap
     Wilverley
     Anderwood
     Knightwood
Website .uk.sch.hants.noadswoodwww
A historical logo of Noadswood School, used before 2006, when it attained Sports College status.

Noadswood School is an academy school and specialist Sports College in Dibden Purlieu, Hampshire, England. It provides state funded education for children from ages 11 to 16.

Background

Noadswood School serves Dibden Purlieu and Hythe on the Southampton Waterside. In 2006 the school became a specialist Sports College and this led to the development of sports facilities and opportunities for all students. This included the recruitment of further PE teachers. The school has an on-site gymnasium, sports hall and all-weather pitch.

In 2010, 81% of Noadswood's Year 11 students attained at least five GCSEs at A*-C grade.[1] 67% attained at least five A*-C grades including English and Maths. These results place the school in the top 25% nationally. Noadswood has a non-selective exam entry policy.

Ofsted (2009) graded Noadswood School as "good with outstanding features".The school's provision of care, guidance and support was rated as being 'excellent'. In 2013, the school was graded as "good".[2]

In 2008, the school replaced the traditional Year Head role with Progress Managers and specialist, non-teaching Guidance Managers. This provides a very personal approach to learning with students benefiting from close support with their academic progress and personal development.

In June 2009, the school switched to a system of vertical tutoring, and a new curriculum was introduced in September 2009.

Noadswood School is one of 15 schools in England, to be selected as a partner school in the Innovation Unit/Paul Hamlyn Foundation Learning Futures programme.

The school's Science Department is at the centre of the school's involvement in the Films for Learning initiative.

In September 2010, Noadswood School was awarded the Continuing Professional Development Mark in recognition of its commitment to the professional learning and development of all its staff. Noadswood has also been shortlisted for a prestigious Becta ICT Excellence Award for its use of IT to enhance learning and engage students and parents both within and beyond the school.

Under the new system of vertical tutoring each child is placed in one of four houses - Anderwood, Knightwood, Deerleap or Wilverley - and assigned to a tutor group of between 20 and 25 students. Each tutor group contains several students from each year group.

Noadswood School has a Learning Support Department for students with Special Educational Needs. The school is one of four in Hampshire equipped to support the learning of physically disabled children and there are on-site physiotherapy and occupational therapy facilities.

In addition to the Learning Support Department, Noadswood has a Pupil Support Centre staffed by the team of Guidance Managers.

Several residential trips are organized at the school, including excursions to Bude, Cologne, Paris and to Ypres & the Somme.

The school sponsors children in Zimbabwe and a secondary school in the Limpopo. The school has run trips to Sefoloko High School every other year since 2009. The pupils that are selected for the trip fundraise the money themselves. The next trip date has yet to be confirmed.

External links

  • "Noadswood Science Department"
  • "Ofsted Website"

References

  1. ^ "Noadswood School". School performance tables 2010. Department for Education. Retrieved 30 May 2014. 
  2. ^ "Noadswood School" (PDF). School Report. Ofsted. 2013. Retrieved 30 May 2014. 
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