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Patrick Norton

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Title: Patrick Norton  
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Subject: Revision3, Veronica Belmont, Discovery Digital Networks, TechTV, Gina Trapani
Collection: 1970 Births, American Television Personalities, Living People, People from Urbana, Illinois, Revision3, Techtv
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Patrick Norton

Patrick Norton
Patrick Norton, October 2006
Born (1970-06-26) June 26, 1970
Urbana, Illinois, United States
Occupation Managing Editor; Host
Children 2
Website

patricknorton.tv
Revision3
Tekzilla
Systm
TWiT (This Week in Tech)

Google+(Google+ Profile)

Patrick Norton (born June 26, 1970) is most commonly known as the former co-host and managing editor of Revision3 properties Tekzilla, HD Nation, and Systm, and as the former co-host and managing editor of The Screen Savers, an interactive television program on the former TechTV network geared toward the technology enthusiast.

He's written hundreds of product reviews for the likes of PC Magazine, CNET, PC World, Computer Power User, and TechTV, launched the online video and podcast group at Ziff Davis where he produced and hosted 188 episodes of DL.TV and started using computers back in the late CP/M early DOS days.

He's best known for answering tough tech questions, skewering products and beating dead PCs with a sledgehammer for the four years at TechTV when he hosted a live daily television show called The Screen Savers.[1]

Contents

  • Professional Highlights 1
  • Career 2
  • Personal life 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Professional Highlights

Host of The Screen Savers on TechTV 2000-2004[2]

Host of DLTV 2005-2007[3]

Revision 3 Host 2007-2014[4][5]

Reviewer for PCMag, Cnet, PC World, CPU and TechTV.[6]

Regular guest host on the This Week In Tech. Host of This Week in Computer Hardware[7]

Career

After graduating from college, Norton tested products and wrote for PC Magazine, Computer Shopper, and InfoWorld, and managed the hardware reviews section of Windows Sources magazine.

In the spring of 2000, ZDTV (later TechTV) named Norton as the co-host (alongside Leo Laporte) and managing editor of The Screen Savers, a television show centered around computers, new technologies, and their adaptations in the world. Norton remained in this capacity until the spring of 2004.

On March 25, 2004, Comcast's G4 gaming channel announced a merger with TechTV. This move became hugely controversial among loyal fans of TechTV. Around May 6, G4 announced the termination of 250 employees from the San Francisco office by July 10, 2004, allowing approximately 80 to 100 employees to transition to G4's main office in Los Angeles, California if they agreed to relocate there. Norton chose to stay in San Francisco instead of moving to Los Angeles, and left the company.[8]

Norton co-hosted an Internet videocast with Robert Heron called DL.TV which covers a wide range of technology related topics and is streamed live every Thursday (it was streamed live twice weekly on Tuesdays and Thursdays until episode 189). Norton has created a large fan base that is still delighted with his work as a technology guru. He announced on August 2, 2007 that he will no longer be the host of DL.TV in favor of a new job and having a child on the way in a few months.[1] His last appearance as the host of DL.TV was episode 188.

Norton also co-hosted a weekly podcast with Jim Louderback, the current CEO for Revision3, called What's New Now. This podcast is no longer being produced, the final episode having been produced May 15, 2007.

Norton wrote for ExtremeiPod before the site was taken down in the wake of pressure from Apple over the use of the word "iPod". He also ran the hardware reviews section of Windows Sources magazine. Norton cut his technical teeth on Osborne and Kaypro CP/M systems in the early 1980s.

Norton occasionally appears on the weekly podcast This Week in Tech (a.k.a. TWiT) along with several other former members of TechTV, including Leo Laporte, Kevin Rose, John C. Dvorak, and his former DL.TV co-host Robert Heron. He is also currently a co-host of This Week in Computer Hardware on the TWIT.TV network along with Ryan Shrout.

Norton was a managing editor at Revision3 where he hosted Systm, HD Nation and Tekzilla. Norton first confirmed his employment with Revision3 on TWiT episode 110 at 58:52 (The popular Netcast hosted by friend Leo Laporte).[9] He announced he would be leaving Revision3 on Tekziiia's last episode on November 25, 2014.[10]

Personal life

Norton currently lives in San Francisco, California, with his wife Sarah[11] and his children.[12][13][14]

References

  1. ^ http://revision3.com/host/patrick-norton Revision3 Official Bio
  2. ^ http://articles/The_Screen_Savers The Screen Savers
  3. ^ http://www.sagarmohan.com/post/7631968/patrick-norton-joins-revision-3-permanently-leaves Patrick Norton Leaves DLTV
  4. ^ http://www.sagarmohan.com/post/7631968/patrick-norton-joins-revision-3-permanently-leaves Patrick Norton Joins Revision3
  5. ^ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wco07wbtcSk&list=UUMkhrrPkmx7xxlolSP9qEsA Last Tekzilla episode, November 25, 2014
  6. ^ http://revision3.com/host/patrick-norton Revision3 Official Bio
  7. ^ http://twit.tv/show/this-week-in-computer-hardware This Week In Computer Hardware.
  8. ^ http://news.cnet.com/2100-1026_3-5207821.html Cnet G4 Lays off San Francisco Staff
  9. ^ http://twit.tv/show/this-week-in-tech/110 This week in Tech Podcast
  10. ^ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wco07wbtcSk&list=UUMkhrrPkmx7xxlolSP9qEsA Last Tekzilla episode, November 25, 2014
  11. ^ retrieved 04/04/2012
  12. ^ This Week in Tech podcast, episode 118 for October 22, 2007
  13. ^ Tekzilla podcast (first 2 minutes), April 3rd, 2012
  14. ^ This week in Tech podcast (first 2 minutes), April 8, 2012

External links

  • Revision3
  • Tekzilla
  • HD Nation
  • Systm
  • This Week in Tech
  • DL.TV
  • What's New Now Podcast
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