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Pepin County, Wisconsin

Pepin County, Wisconsin
Map of Wisconsin highlighting Pepin County
Location in the state of Wisconsin
Map of the United States highlighting Wisconsin
Wisconsin's location in the U.S.
Founded February 25, 1858
Named for Pierre and Jean Pepin du Chardonnets
Seat Durand
Largest city Durand
Area
 • Total 249 sq mi (645 km2)
 • Land 232 sq mi (601 km2)
 • Water 17 sq mi (44 km2), 6.7%
Population
 • (2010) 7,469
 • Density 32/sq mi (12/km²)
Congressional district 3rd
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Website .us.wi.pepin.cowww

Pepin County is a county in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. As of the 2010 census, the population was 7,469,[1] making it the fourth-least populous county in Wisconsin. Its county seat is Durand.[2]

Pepin County was the birthplace of Laura Ingalls Wilder.

Contents

  • History 1
  • Geography 2
    • Adjacent counties 2.1
    • Major highways 2.2
  • Demographics 3
  • Government and politics 4
    • County Board of Supervisors 4.1
    • Presidential elections 4.2
  • Communities 5
    • City 5.1
    • Villages 5.2
    • Towns 5.3
    • Census-designated place 5.4
    • Unincorporated communities 5.5
  • See also 6
  • References 7
  • External links 8

History

Pepin County was formed in 1858 from portions of Dunn County. It was named after the French conquistadors Pierre and Jean Pepin du Chardonnets.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 249 square miles (640 km2), of which 232 square miles (600 km2) is land and 17 square miles (44 km2) (6.7%) is water.[3] It is the smallest county in Wisconsin by area.

Adjacent counties

Major highways

Demographics

2000 Census Age Pyramid for Pepin County

As of the census[9] of 2000, there were 7,213 people, 2,759 households, and 1,934 families residing in the county. The population density was 31 people per square mile (12/km²). There were 3,036 housing units at an average density of 13 per square mile (5/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 98.90% White, 0.08% Black or African American, 0.19% Native American, 0.21% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.08% from other races, and 0.49% from two or more races. 0.35% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 41.6% were of German, 13.5% Norwegian, 9.9% Austrian and 6.8% Swedish ancestry according to Census 2000. 95.2% spoke English and 3.4% German as their first language.

There were 2,759 households out of which 32.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.90% were married couples living together, 6.80% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.90% were non-families. 26.10% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.60% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.57 and the average family size was 3.13.

In the county, the population was spread out with 26.50% under the age of 18, 7.90% from 18 to 24, 25.90% from 25 to 44, 22.80% from 45 to 64, and 16.80% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 101.10 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.20 males.

Government and politics

County Board of Supervisors

Pepin County has a 12-member board of supervisors.[10]

District # Location Board Member
*District 1 Town of Albany Jim Dawson
*District 2 Town of Lima (part) Ronald Weiss
*District 3 Town of Durand (part), Town of Lima (part) James K. Kraft
*District 4 City of Durand (part) Peter Adler (Chair)
*District 5 City of Durand (part) Gerald M. Bauer
*District 6 City of Durand (part) Betty J. Bergmark
*District 7 Town of Durand (part), Town of Waubeek Bill Ingram
*District 8 Town of Waterville (part) Sean Scallon
*District 9 Town of Frankfort, Town of Waterville (part) Dwight Jelle
*District 10 Town of Pepin (part), Village of Pepin (part) Bruce Peterson
*District 11 Village of Pepin (part) Dorothy Thompson *
*District 12 Town of Pepin (part), Town of Stockholm,

Village of Stockholm

Steven L. Anderson
  • Former board member Kim A. Seipel moved out of District 11, and therefore was forced to resign his seat.

Presidential elections

The last time Pepin County voted for the Republican candidate was in 1972, when voters backed President Nixon (R) over George McGovern (D).

Presidential elections results[11]
Year Republican Democratic
2012 48.50% 1,794 50.72% 1,876
2008 42.85% 1,616 55.74% 2,102
2004 45.57% 1,853 53.64% 2,181
2000 44.51% 1,631 50.60% 1,854
1996 32.60% 1,007 51.31% 1,585
1992 28.05% 1,098 46.84% 1,673
1988 40.36% 1,311 58.68% 1,906
1984 48.56% 1,555 50.87% 1,629
1980 44.40% 1,541 48.20% 1,673
1976 39.35% 1,312 58.64% 1,955
1972 49.26% 1,458 47.60% 1,409
1968 49.98% 1,493 42.28% 1,263
1964 33.11% 1,069 66.71% 2,154
1960 47.76% 1,612 52.24% 1,763
1956 65.51% 1,964 34.49% 1,040
1952 72.14% 2,348 27.53% 896
1948 48.23% 1,333 49.96% 1,381
1944 64.28% 1,902 34.78% 1,029
1940 64.51% 2,272 33.90% 1,194
1936 42.54% 1,466 51.80% 1,785
1932 36.86% 1,152 61.79% 1,931
1928 55.88% 1,226 9.39% 206
  • Note: In 1928, Progressive candidate Robert M. La Follette, Sr. came in second in Pepin County, receiving 33.59% of the vote (737 votes).

Communities

City

Villages

Towns

Census-designated place

Unincorporated communities

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 23, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved August 8, 2015. 
  4. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  5. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 8, 2015. 
  6. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved August 8, 2015. 
  7. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 8, 2015. 
  8. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved August 8, 2015. 
  9. ^ "American FactFinder".  
  10. ^ Pepin County Board of Supervisors Retrieved 2011-04-15.
  11. ^ Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections Retrieved 2011-04-15.

External links

  • Pepin County
  • History of Buffalo and Pepin Counties

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