Pontifical universities

Pontifical universities are "academic institutes established or approved directly by the Holy See, composed of three main ecclesiastical faculties (Theology, Philosophy and Canon Law) and at least one other faculty. These academic institutes deal specifically with the Christian revelation and related disciplines, and the Church’s mission of spreading the Gospel, as proclaimed in the Apostolic Constitution Sapientia christiana."[1]

Pontifical universities follow a European system of degrees in the sacred faculties, granting the baccalaureate, the licentiate, and the doctorate. These ecclesiastical degrees are prerequisites to certain offices in the Roman Catholic Church, especially considering that bishop candidates are selected mainly from priests who are doctors of sacred theology (S.T.D.) or canon law (J.C.D.) and that ecclesiastical judges and attorneys must be at least licentiates of canon law (J.C.L.).

Quality and Ranking

Compared to secular or Catholic universities, which are academic institutions for the study and teaching of a broad range of disciplines, ecclesiastical or Pontifical universities are "usually composed of three principal ecclesiastical faculties, theology, philosophy, and canon law, and at least one other faculty. A Pontifical university specifically addresses Christian revelation and disciplines correlative to the evangelical mission of the Church as set out in the apostolic constitution Sapientia christiana." [2][3]

Current international quality ranking services do not have a quality ranking category that reflects the unique nature and mission of Pontifical universities, nor do their methodologies take into account this unique nature and mission in a way that reflects their educational quality. Since 19 September 2003 the Holy See has taken part in the Bologna Process, a series of meetings and agreements between European states designed to foster comparable quality standards in higher education, and in the "Bologna Follow-up Group". The Holy See’s Agency for the Evaluation and Promotion of Quality in Ecclesiastical Universities and Faculties (AVEPRO) was established on 19 September 2007 by Pope Benedict XVI "to promote and develop a culture of quality within the academic institutions that depend directly on the Holy See and ensure they possess internationally valid quality criteria." [3]

List of pontifical universities

Annuario Pontificio>

Argentina

Austria

Belgium

Brazil

Canada

Chile

Colombia

Cuba

Dominican Republic

Ecuador

  • Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador, Quito

France

Germany

Guatemala

Indonesia

Ireland

  • St Patrick's College, Maynooth, Maynooth ; Pontifical University charter 1896
  • Clonliffe College, Dublin ; A number of other institutions in the past would have awarded degrees Angelicum University such as Clonliffe College and other seminaries in Ireland.

Italy

Ivory Coast (Côte d'Ivoire)

Kenya

Lebanon

Mexico

  • Pontifical University of Mexico, Mexico City

Netherlands

Panama

Paraguay

  • Universidad Católica Nuestra Señora de la Asunción, Asuncion

Philippines

Poland

Portugal

  • Catholic University of Portugal, Lisbon

Puerto Rico

Spain

United States

Uruguay

Former pontifical universities

References

See also

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